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In JavaScript I can write:

myobject.doSomething = function() {
    // stuff..
}

So how do I use this @Override-thing of Java to achieve the same?

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closed as off-topic by Oliver Charlesworth, Uwe Plonus, Richard Sitze, Beryllium, Sean Owen Mar 1 '14 at 12:27

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – Richard Sitze, Beryllium
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Can you be please more specific about your issue. And please don't ask us convert code from one language to another. We don't do it. – Rohit Jain Jul 20 '13 at 20:48
1  
You can't do that in Java. It's not a dynamic language like JavaScript. – JB Nizet Jul 20 '13 at 20:51
1  
Java's OO is not prototype-based, unlike that of Javascript. So you cannot do this. – Oliver Charlesworth Jul 20 '13 at 20:51
    
so how does this @Override-thing work? – andy Jul 20 '13 at 20:53
    
@Override doesn't do anything. It's simply an annotation, that allows the compiler to perform further sanity checking. – Oliver Charlesworth Jul 20 '13 at 20:55
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You cannot override a method of a single object in Java because Java is not a functional language. You can, however, override the method in a subclass of the class declaring your method.

Declaring an anonymous class:

new MyClass() {
    @Override void myMethod() {
        ....
    }
}
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Do you mean something like this?

Main.java

private class SuperClass
{
  public void myMethod()
  {
    System.out.println("Test!");
  }
}

private class ChildClass extends SuperClass
{
  @Override
  pubic void myMethod()
  {
    System.out.println("Testtest!");
  }
}

public class Main
{
  public static void main(String[] args)
  {
    SuperClass superInstance = new SuperClass();
    ChildClass childInstance = new ChildClass();

    superInstance.myMethod();
    childInstance.myMethod();
  }
}
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You can do this when the object is being created using an anonymous class; basically you create a subclass for the one object only. Example:

Label label = new Label() {
    @Override
    public void setText(String text) {
        super.setText(text);
        System.out.println("Text has been set to " + text);
    }
};

label.setText("Test");
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