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From all the questions here I assume most people want their divs (or lis or whatever) to fill horizontal space. I want them to only be as long as I need. Here, they fill the horizontal space:

http://jsfiddle.net/nnFpN/

I can make the UL element have display:inline-block, which makes it shrink horizontally, but if I put the LIs to inline-block, they start appearing side-by-side, which isn't what I want. I want the LIs to be only as wide as they need to be.

Also, when should a div (or ul or li or whatever) fill the horizontal space, and when shouldn't it?

html:

<div id="center_main">
    <div id="data_box" class="center_box">
        <ul id="keys">
            <li class="key">key1</li>
            <li class="key">key1 . key2</li>
            <li class="key">key1 . key3</li>
            <li class="key">key1 . key3 . key4</li>
            <li class="key">key5</li>
        </ul>
    </div>
</div>

css: (sorry about the duplicates, they're coming from two different files, layout.css and colors.css)

#center_main {
    margin: 25px auto;
}

.center_box {
    margin: 10px 0px;
    padding: 3px;
}

#keys {
    padding: 0px;
    margin: 0px 2px;
}

#keys li {
    padding: 1px 3px;
    margin: 3px 0px;
}

body {
    background-color: #F1F1F1;
    color: #333333;
}

.center_box {
    background-color: #FFFFFF;
    box-shadow: 0 0 10px #333333;
    border-radius: 4px;
    border: 0px solid #3981EC;
    border-width: 4px 0px 0px 0px;
}

#keys {
    list-style: none;
}

#keys li {
    background-color: #666666;
    color: #FFFFFF;
    border-radius: 4px;
}

#keys li:hover{
    background-color: #3981EC;
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

A div fills horizontal space because it's a block-level element, though you can obviously change this behaviour by changing it's display attribute to something like inline or inline-block. You can see on that link that lists (ul, ol and dl) are also block-level elements.

In your case, if you want an element to only occupy the space it needs then you should use either inline or inline-block (inline-block allowing you to add padding/margins etc.). However, because that removes the default block nature of the DIV/UL, as you pointed out, each element then follows the next on the same horizontal row.

To overcome this, you should use the float attribute, which will remove the block nature of the element, but then also apply a clear attribute which will remove the float for each element, thus making each element occupy only the space it needs whilst ensuring that they're all on different lines.

Also make sure that the element following your list is cleared, or you apply the micro-clearfix hack to the list.

And here's your example edited to work the way you described.

HTML

<!-- Note added the .cf class -->
<ul id="keys" class="cf">
  <li class="key">key1</li>
  <li class="key">key1 . key2</li>
  <li class="key">key1 . key3</li>
  <li class="key">key1 . key3 . key4</li>
  <li class="key">key5</li>
</ul>

CSS

#keys li {
  padding: 1px 3px;
  margin: 3px 0px;
  float:left;
  clear:both;
}
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Div is a type of elements called block-level elements. Block-level elements, by default, fill all the horizontal space of their container because by default, they have the style property display:block;.

To make any block-level element expand to only its content, aka inline-level, set its css property to display: inline.
This is the solution to your problem.
As to your second question, (when should a div fill a horizontal space and when it shouldn't), that's your call to make. You can make a block level element inline and vice-versa.

That being said, it's a bad design to make a div or p element an inline-level element. You can simply use span or any other inline-level containers for that. The usual exception is when using li.

Li are block-level, but if you want them to be horizontal and do not want to float them, you can make them inline. Be aware that by doing so, each Li will only have a width as wide as its content. Moreover, inline-level elements cannot have their padding set.


Hope this helps.

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with width:auto, div will be as wide as the parent auto is the default value for width.

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You could try
float:left; clear:both;
for each list element.

And as for when do they fill their horizontal space, it depends on the way you display them. A display:block element will fill a the whole width its aloud regardless of its content, or if a width: xx; is set it will be the exact width you set. Inline-block and inline are similarly spaced in that they take up the space of the content unless given an exact width and attempt to line up horizontally until they run out of space.

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This will work and if you need to add a backgroud color to the ul or div you will need to use clearfix. One not though, each element will have its own size, not expand to the largest of the set. –  hungerstar Jul 20 '13 at 21:19

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