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Here's an example of a linked list Node struct containing an int data and a NodePtr next.

My idea is to use a typedef for the NodePtr because I want to experiment with a raw pointer vs. a shared_ptr. Also, to keep it simple, I want to be able to change just a single line to go from one to the other.

With raw pointers, the following code compiles just fine.

typedef struct Node* NodePtr;
struct Node {
   int data;
   NodePtr next;
};

But if I simply change the typedef to a shared_ptr, I get compilation errors.

typedef std::shared_ptr<Node> NodePtr;
struct Node {
   int data;
   NodePtr next;
};

error: ‘Node’ was not declared in this scope
error: template argument 1 is invalid

I can fix this by making a forward declaration of Node. However, the double definitions of Node look a bit ugly to me.

struct Node;
typedef std::shared_ptr<Node> NodePtr;
struct Node {
   int data;
   NodePtr next;
};

So, why does the first typedef work fine but the second one does not? And, is it possible to typedef shared_ptrs without using a forward declaration?

share|improve this question
    
By the way, a shared_ptr is in all probability the wrong smart pointer here. Do you really want shared ownership? Isn’t unique_ptr more likely, given the structure? –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 20 '13 at 21:34
    
Thanks, yes, shared_ptr is not what's needed for this example. I am simply experimenting with how you'd replace a raw pointer with a smart pointer. –  user2602740 Jul 20 '13 at 22:50

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

So, why does the first typedef work fine but the second one does not?

Because your first typedef forward-declares Node:

typedef struct Node* NodePtr;
//      ^^^^^^^^^^^

You could do the same in the second typedef:

typedef std::shared_ptr<struct Node> NodePtr;

If you want to avoid it, declare the typedef inside the structure:

struct Node {
    typedef Node* ptr; // no need for `struct`!
    // or `typedef std::shared_ptr<Node> ptr;`
    int data;
    ptr next;
};

Also, since this is C++11, you can use using instead of typedef:

using ptr = Node*; // vs. `using ptr = std::shared_ptr<Node>`
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your response. I understand it better now. If I move the typedef inside the struct, it will only be visible in that scope. But since I want NodePtr to be visible in other places, I would prefer the typedef to be outside. –  user2602740 Jul 20 '13 at 22:46
    
@user2602740 You can always do Node::ptr from the outside. –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 21 '13 at 1:21
    
Yes, of course. Thanks. –  user2602740 Jul 21 '13 at 4:08

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