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There is a site with one main index.html page (with <html><head>...) and pages like gallery.html, contacts.html, but only with <div> containers and without <html><head>....

So, when i click on index.html link to contacts.html what happens:

$('.contacts').click(function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    $('#content').load('contacts.html', function() {
        .....
    });
});

Q: How should i structure or organize javascript code for any events like click on contacts.html?

For example:

[1] I can write on contacts.html javascript code like:

<script type='text/javascript'>
$(function() {
    $('.anyClassOnContactsHtml').click(function(e) {
        .....
    });
});
</script>

But as i guess, every time when i load contacts.html it reads the functions again and that is why the speed and performance of the site may be lower, because i have 50+ click events on every page.

[2] I can write on index.html delegates:

<script type='text/javascript'>
$(function() {
    $('#content').on('click', '.anyClassOnContactsHtml', function(e) {
        .....
    });
});
</script>

It works and browsers read click functions 1 time, but with 100+ click functions there are 2-3 SECONDS (!) delay, so it works very slow.

To work it faster i should instead of #content write container that is nearer to my .anyClassOnContactsHtml, but i can't, because on index.html there are only #container.

So, how should i do? Or are there other ways to bind events? Any tips for site performance? Thank you.

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4 Answers 4

1) You can actually call sub-elements that way.

${"#content .anyClassOnContactsHtml").click(function() { });

2) Take a look at: http://developer.yahoo.com/yslow/. For example, placing <script> tags at the bottom of <body> </body> will allow the rest of the page to load quicker.

Install the plugin and run the test on your page.

share|improve this answer
    
i thing this not true, this is not a good selector: when like this then use find() like: ${"#content").find(".anyClassOnContactsHtml") –  reyaner Jul 20 '13 at 23:25
    
@reyaner Both work, but find is a lot quicker in a bigger structure. Thanks for mentioning this. –  Yawn Jul 21 '13 at 0:26

When you load() content, any code within loaded script tags is completely ignored, so it has no impact on javascript performance.

What might be the issue is that the way the content is loaded. Make sure you're not re-binding the click functions each time. Here is some example code:

<script type='text/javascript'>
$(function() {

    $('.contacts').click(function(e) {
        e.preventDefault();
        $('#content').load('contacts.html', function() {
            // DO NOT REBIND CLICK EVENTS HERE
        });
    });

    // The following should only be done ONCE
    $('#content').on('click', '.anyClassOnContactsHtml', function(e) {
        .....
    });
});
</script>
share|improve this answer

Is something like this really that slow?? I would say its should be okay!

<script type='text/javascript'>
$(function() {
    $('.contacts').click(function(e) {
        e.preventDefault();
        $('#content').load('contacts.html', function() {
            $('#content_of_loaded').on('click', '.anyClassOnContactsHtml', function(e) {
                .....
            });
         });
    }); 
});
</script>

Maybe you could also try this:

<script type='text/javascript'>
    $(function() {
        $('a').click(function(e) {
            e.preventDefault();
            var site = $(this).attr("href");
            $('#content').load(site, function() {
                $('#sub_content').on('click', '.anyClassOnContactsHtml', function(e) {
                    .....
                });
             });
        }); 
    });
</script>

and also for your subcontent links you could do this maybe..

function loadContent(site) {
    $('#content').load(site, function() {
        $('#sub_content').on('click', 'a', function(e) {
            e.preventDefault();
            loadContent($(this).attr("href"));
        });
    });
}
$(function() {
    $('a').click(function(e) {
       e.preventDefault();
       loadContent($(this).attr("href"));
    }); 
}); 

but i didnt test it, so might be wrong :)

share|improve this answer
    
All of these solutions still lead to 50+ click functions which he said was the cause of the slowness, so if that's the case, none of these will matter until some refactoring has been done. For example, there is no reason you can't have one click function for most/all events, even if that functions only job is to call other functions. –  Jordan Denison Jul 21 '13 at 4:30

I think the only way you are going to have any luck performance optimizing this is if you refactor some of your click functions to combine them and make them more multi-purpose by adding more method parameters, switch statements, etc... The most efficient way then would be to bind them all to #content since they won't have to be reloaded every time there is a URL change. The data attribute can help immensely with this. If you took the time to do it properly, you could even refactor all of your code into one event handler function.

A very contrived example of a function like this would be:

$('#content').on('click', 'a, span, input', function(e) {
    var tagName = $(e.target).prop('tagName');
    switch (tagName) {
        case 'a':
            processAnchorEvents();
            break;
        case 'span':
            processSpanEvents();
            break;
        case 'input':
            processInputEvents();
            break;                 
    }
});
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