Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My question is regarding a child object maintaining the prototype chain of its parent object.

In John Resig's Advanced Javascript slides (http://ejohn.org/apps/learn/#76) he writes that in order to maintain the prototype chain of a child object you must instantiate a new parent object.

However through a couple quick tests I noticed that the prototype chain is maintained by just setting the child object prototype equal to the parent object prototype.

Any clarification would be greatly appreciated!

Original Code

function Person(){}
Person.prototype.dance = function(){};

function Ninja(){}

// Achieve similar, but non-inheritable, results
Ninja.prototype = Person.prototype;
Ninja.prototype = { dance: Person.prototype.dance };

assert( (new Ninja()) instanceof Person, "Will fail with bad prototype chain." );

// Only this maintains the prototype chain
Ninja.prototype = new Person();

var ninja = new Ninja();
assert( ninja instanceof Ninja, "ninja receives functionality from the Ninja prototype" );
assert( ninja instanceof Person, "... and the Person prototype" );
assert( ninja instanceof Object, "... and the Object prototype" );

My Modified Version

function Person(){}
Person.prototype.dance = function(){console.log("Dance")};

function Ninja(){}

// Achieve similar, but non-inheritable, results
Ninja.prototype = Person.prototype;

assert( (new Ninja()) instanceof Person, "Will fail with bad prototype chain." );

var ninja = new Ninja();
assert( ninja instanceof Ninja, "ninja receives functionality from the Ninja prototype" );
assert( ninja instanceof Person, "... and the Person prototype" );
assert( ninja instanceof Object, "... and the Object prototype" );
ninja.dance();
share|improve this question
1  
this might help –  aaronman Jul 21 '13 at 2:05
1  
In "modern" browsers you'd do: Ninja.prototype = Object.create(Person.prototype). –  elclanrs Jul 21 '13 at 2:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In the code John Resig provided he first sets Ninja.prototype to Person.prototype. Then he immediately resets it to { dance: Person.prototype.dance }:

// Achieve similar, but non-inheritable, results
Ninja.prototype = Person.prototype;
Ninja.prototype = { dance: Person.prototype.dance };

The result is that any object created by the Ninja constructor will directly inherit from { dance: Person.prototype.dance } which is not an instance of Person.prototype. Hence (new Ninja) instanceof Person will return false. In this case the prototype chain is:

        null
         ^
         |
         | [[prototype]]
         |
+------------------+
| Object.prototype |
+------------------+
         ^
         |
         | [[prototype]]
         |
+------------------+
|  Ninja.prototype |
+------------------+
         ^
         |
         | [[prototype]]
         |
+------------------+
|     new Ninja    |
+------------------+

In the modified version you remove the second assignment to Ninja.prototype, effectively setting Ninja.prototype to Person.prototype. Hence the prototype chain is:

         null
          ^
          |
          | [[prototype]]
          |
+-------------------+
|  Object.prototype |
+-------------------+
          ^
          |
          | [[prototype]]
          |
+-------------------+
| Ninja.prototype / |
| Person.prototype  |
+-------------------+
          ^
          |
          | [[prototype]]
          |
+-------------------+
|     new Ninja     |
+-------------------+

Notice that since Ninja.prototype is the same as Person.prototype both (new Ninja) intanceof Ninja and (new Ninja) instanceof Person will return true. This is because the instanceof operator depends on the prototype of a constructor.

However the right way to do achieve inheritance in JavaScript would be to set Ninja.prototype to Object.create(Person.prototype) (or in the old school way to new Person), in which case the prototype chain would be:

        null
         ^
         |
         | [[prototype]]
         |
+------------------+
| Object.prototype |
+------------------+
         ^
         |
         | [[prototype]]
         |
+------------------+
| Person.prototype |
+------------------+
         ^
         |
         | [[prototype]]
         |
+------------------+
|  Ninja.prototype |
+------------------+
         ^
         |
         | [[prototype]]
         |
+------------------+
|     new Ninja    |
+------------------+

Note: Always remember that in JavaScript objects inherit from other objects. They never inherit from constructor functions. If you wish to learn about true prototypal inheritance in JavaScript then read my blog post on why prototypal inhritance matters.

share|improve this answer
    
Great blog post. Thanks for the resource! –  Mr. Smee Jul 21 '13 at 3:30

If you don't like the way prototyping works in JavaScript in order to achieve what you need, I'd suggest taking a look at this: https://github.com/haroldiedema/joii

It basically allows you to do the following (and more):

var Employee = new Class(function() {
    this.name = 'Unknown Employee';
    this.role = 'Employee';
});

var Manager = new Class({ extends: Employee }, function()
{
    // Overwrite the value of 'role'.
    this.role = 'Manager';

    // Class constructor to apply the given 'name' value.
    this.__construct = function(name) {
        this.name = name;
    }
});

var myManager = new Manager("John Smith");
console.log( myManager.name ); // John Smith
console.log( myManager.role ); // Manager
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.