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Hi I got a question about permissions on c++ member function.

Example 1

class Test {
    private:
    void func() { cout << "test" << endl; }
};

void weird_func(Test* t, void (Test::*f)()) {
    (t->*f)();
}

int main() {
    Test t;
    weird_func(&t, &Test::func);
}

This wouldn't work

test1.cc: In function ‘int main()’:
test1.cc:10:10: error: ‘void Test::func()’ is private
test1.cc:19:26: error: within this context

However, another example works

class Test {
    public:
    void helper(Test* ptr);
    private:
    void func() { cout << "test" << endl; }
};

void weird_func(Test* t, void (Test::*f)()) {
    (t->*f)();
}

void Test::helper(Test* ptr) {
    weird_func(ptr, &Test::func);
}

int main() {
    Test t;
    t.helper(&t);
}

I don't quite understand why would the second example work. The only difference is that it has a helper function. Test::func is invoked in weird_func for both examples, which is not a member of class Test. I guess there is some information about permission stored with the member function pointer. Would someone confirm (or deny) this and explain a bit of the reason under the hood?

Thanks, Di

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Why do you conclude that any special permission information is carried in the member function pointer? The problem doesn't occur where the pointer is used, after all. It occurs when you try to mention the member function that you intend to point at. –  Rob Kennedy Jul 21 '13 at 5:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

::helper has access to the private function and thus can address it, or in this case pass the address to another function. Once it's referenced as a function pointer it can be passed around just as you could with a pointer to a class attribute. It's dangerous in the wrong hands :).

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