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#include <functional>

void foo(std::function<void()> f) { f(); }
void foo(void (*f)()) { f(); }

int main ()
{
  foo( [](){} );
}

VS compiles, gcc and clang complain about ambiguous overload. Who's right? The lambda is supposed to be of a class type, so there should not be any conversion between it and a function pointer. Thus VS appears to be right, against all odds. But perhaps I'm missing something.

Is there a simple way to disambiguate the call, apart from casting the lambda to either type?

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2  
Lambdas that don't capture anything (empty []) are implicitly convertible to a function pointer of the same signature. VS (at least the version you use) does not implement this yet. –  JohannesD Jul 21 '13 at 12:45
    
@JohannesD OK found this mentioned in 5.1.2/6. Please make your comment an answer so I can accept it. –  n.m. Jul 21 '13 at 13:20
1  
You can try disambiguating this ambiguity with f( +[](){} );. Hope this helps. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jul 22 '13 at 16:31
    
@JohannesSchaub-litb: Thanks I will look into it. –  n.m. Jul 22 '13 at 19:26
    
@JohannesSchaub-litb - what does the + do? Where in the standard is this mentioned please? –  Steve Lorimer Jul 23 '13 at 5:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Non-capturing lambdas have an implicit conversion to a function pointer with the same signature. This is specified in chapter 5.1.2 paragraph 6:

The closure type for a lambda-expression with no lambda-capture has a public non-virtual non-explicit const conversion function to pointer to function having the same parameter and return types as the closure type’s function call operator. The value returned by this conversion function shall be the address of a function that, when invoked, has the same effect as invoking the closure type’s function call operator.

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A lambda creates an anonymous and unspecified object that can be called, it's neither a function pointer nor a std::function object but can be used as both a function pointer and a std::function object, giving you the ambiguous overload error. I would say that VS is wrong.

Also, since a function pointer can be used to create a std::function object, I would say that using an overload that takes a function pointer is not needed if you already have a function taking a std::function argument.

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1  
The standard says: The type of the lambda-expression (which is also the type of the closure object) is a unique, unnamed nonunion _class type_. The function pointer overload is more efficient as std::function involves all kinds of overhead (not significant in my particular case, but on principle I should not be forced to pay this cost). –  n.m. Jul 21 '13 at 11:40
    
@n.m - Whether it's a class type or not bears no relevance here - conversions between class types and between a class type and a builtin type are equal in the eyes of the overload resolution algorithm. Adding a special case just for the sake of lambdas would be a needless complication. –  JohannesD Jul 21 '13 at 12:51
    
@JohannesD - Why is there a conversion between this particular class type and the function pointer type? Does the standard explicitly mention such a conversion? –  n.m. Jul 21 '13 at 13:11
    
@n.m. - Because it's useful. The standard specifies this in 5.1.2/6: The closure type for a lambda-expression with no lambda-capture has a public non-virtual non-explicit const conversion function to pointer to function having the same parameter and return types as the closure type’s function call operator. The value returned by this conversion function shall be the address of a function that, when invoked, has the same effect as invoking the closure type’s function call operator. –  JohannesD Jul 21 '13 at 13:17

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