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I have the SQL to display ALL the activities and relative Admin permissions (if any) for that activity.

Current SQL Code:

SELECT `activities`.*, `admins`.`admin_role_id`
FROM (`activities`)
LEFT JOIN `admins` ON `admins`.`activity_id`=`activities`.`id` AND admins.member_id=27500
WHERE `activities`.`active` =  1

Returning:

id | name | description | active | admin_role_id (or null)

I then need to detect whether they are an active member within that Activity.

I have the following SQL code:

SELECT DISTINCT `products`.`activity_ID` as joinedID
FROM (`transactions_items`)
JOIN `transactions` ON `transactions`.`id` = `transactions_items`.`id`
JOIN `products` ON `products`.`id` = `transactions_items`.`product_id`
JOIN `activities` ON `activities`.`id` = `products`.`activity_ID`
WHERE `transactions`.`member_id` =  27500
AND `activities`.`active` =  1

Is there any way to merge this into one SQL query. I can't figure out how to use the correct JOIN queries, because of the complexity of the JOINs.

Help please, thanks! :)

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try like this

SELECT `activities`.*, `admins`.`admin_role_id`
FROM (`activities`)
LEFT JOIN `admins` ON `admins`.`activity_id`=`activities`.`id` AND admins.member_id=27500
    JOIN (`transactions_items`
    JOIN `transactions` ON `transactions`.`id` = `transactions_items`.`id`
    JOIN `products` ON `products`.`id` = `transactions_items`.`product_id`)
ON `activities`.`id`=`products`.`activity_ID`
WHERE `transactions`.`member_id` =  27500
AND `activities`.`active` =  1
share|improve this answer
    
Nithesh, thanks for the attempted solution, but I am getting an SQL error near: (JOIN (transactions_items) JOIN transactions ON transactions.id = transactions_items.id JOIN products ON products.id = transactions_items.product_id) –  BigDistance Jul 21 '13 at 12:18
    
please try putting join outside the bracket –  Nithesh Jul 21 '13 at 12:38
    
I am edited the answer. can you check now. –  Nithesh Jul 21 '13 at 12:44
    
Brilliant! - however this is now returning the results ONLY when they are joined. What I need is to return ALL active activities. Then for the 'Admin' and 'isJoined' they need to be populated or NULL. EG. id | name | description | active | admin_role_id (or NULL) | isJoined (or NULL) The isJoined, could even return a boolean, which would be even better? –  BigDistance Jul 21 '13 at 12:47
    
I have updated your solution. I presume a LEFT OUTER JOIN would be the best way? Thanks again! :) –  BigDistance Jul 21 '13 at 13:36

Seems to me that a query like this would be marginally more comprehensible and (I think) adhere more closely to the spec...

SELECT c.*
     , d.admin_role_id
  FROM activities c
  LEFT 
  JOIN admins d
    ON d.activity_id = c.id 
   AND d.member_id = 27500
  LEFT
  JOIN products p
    ON p.activity_ID = c.id 
  LEFT
  JOIN transactions_items ti
    ON ti.product_id = p.id
  LEFT
  JOIN transactions t
    ON t.id = ti.id
   AND t.member_id =  27500
 WHERE c.active =  1
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this is more comprehensible, however it is returning over 500,00 rows, as opposed to the 100 activities? - Josh. –  BigDistance Jul 21 '13 at 14:19
    
So, SELECT DISTINCT c.* would work. but is this the best way? –  BigDistance Jul 21 '13 at 14:46
    
You tell me! ;-) –  Strawberry Jul 21 '13 at 16:59
    
Sorry, but by the 'best way', I meant whichever would be less server-intensive. There are only 104 rows in the Activities table, yet this is returning 500,000 rows. Would using DISTINCT on the above query be just as good? :) –  BigDistance Jul 21 '13 at 18:48
1  
'Be just as good' as what? It's a different query, so it depends on what you want. That said, the DISTINCT operator is, apparently, efficient. –  Strawberry Jul 21 '13 at 21:26

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