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Question:

Given the following code snippet:

bool foo(int n) {
   for(int i=3;i<sqrt(n)+0.5;i+=2)
      {
        if((n%i)==0){
          return false;
         }
      }
   return true;
}

Can you figure out what is the purpose of the function foo ?

Well,On first look it may seems that foo is checking for prime numbers but it is not the case.I wrote a small test program and got this output:

foo returns true for these numbers between 1 to 100:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 13 14 16 17 19 20 22 23 26 28 29 31 32 34 37 38 41 43 44 4 6 47 52 53 58 59 61 62 64 67 68 71 73 74 76 79 82 83 86 88 89 92 94 97

foo returns false for these numbers between 1 to 100:

9 12 15 18 21 24 25 27 30 33 35 36 39 40 42 45 48 49 50 51 54 55 56 57 60 63 65 66 69 70 72 75 77 78 80 81 84 85 87 90 91 93 95 96 98 99 100

I am unable to understand what the foo is doing from the series.

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@nthrgeek: why is this function called foo? is there a chance you have got this function with a dis-assembler and this is why you don't know its name? give us some context or I'm inclined to believe you are reverse engineering something you shouldn't be! –  jkp Nov 22 '09 at 0:39
    
@jkp: No,It is an interview question,which want us to answer the purpose of this function,Hence the name foo. :) –  whacko__Cracko Nov 22 '09 at 0:43
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4 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

It looks like a prime number checker that doesn't deal with even numbers or one, i.e. it assumes that you've already discarded even numbers and one.

The numbers for which it returns true are primes, or some non-primes that consist of powers of two multiplied by at most one other prime. The non-primes that it returns true for are those with no odd prime divisors or where the only odd prime divisor is larger than the square root of the original number.

Have a look at a list of numbers for which n % 2 && foo(n).

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i think this is the best answer –  Scott Evernden Nov 22 '09 at 1:17
    
But 1 is not prime. –  whacko__Cracko Nov 22 '09 at 1:30
    
Well,if we discard 1 & all other even numbers,+ assume 2 to be the first number (without checking), then only it gives correct answer for the remaining numbers. –  whacko__Cracko Nov 22 '09 at 1:33
    
haha .. depends on how you define prime! –  Scott Evernden Nov 22 '09 at 1:34
3  
1 isn't prime, otherwise numbers wouldn't have unique prime factorizations. –  GManNickG Nov 22 '09 at 1:52
show 5 more comments

After reading at the answer from Charles Bailey,I think that function is actually checking for prime numbers with some constraints.

It is checking for prime numbers assuming that you have already discarded 1 & all the even numbers.Also you have to consider that 2 is a prime number yourself.

The C++ program for the conclusion:

#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>
#define MAX 1000

bool foo(int n) {
   for(int i=3;i<sqrt(n)+0.5;i+=2)
      {
        if((n%i)==0){
          return false;
         }
      }
    return true;

}

int isprime(int num){ /*Sieve of eratosthenes */

if(num == 1) return false;
bool Primes[MAX+1] = {0};
bool flag;

for(int i=2;i*i<=MAX;i++)
   if(Primes[i] == 0)
     for(int j=2*i;j<=MAX;j+=i)
        Primes[j] = 1;

return !Primes[num];
}

int main(void){
   int Count = 1;
   std::cout<<2<<" ";
   for(int i=2;i<=MAX;i++){
       if((i % 2) && foo(i)){std::cout<<i<<" ";
        Count++;
      }
  }
  std::cout<<"\nCount :"<<Count<<"\n\n\n";

 Count ^= Count;
 for(int i=1;i<=MAX;i++){
    if(isprime(i) == true){std::cout<<i<<" ";
    Count++;
    }
}
std::cout<<"\nCount :"<<Count<<"\n\n\n";

return 0;
}

Thanks !

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It returns true if n has no divisors other than 1, n, and perhaps 2 and n/2. (EDIT: That isn't quite right, as the comments pointed out. New attempt: It returns true if n has no divisors less than or equal to sqrt(n) other than 1, and perhaps powers of 2.)

(To me, it looks like it was intended to return prime numbers but has a bug: it does not consider 2 as a possible divisor.)

share|improve this answer
    
re: the bug, yeah, that was my impression as well. Nothing like a broken interview question. ;^)~ –  Don Wakefield Nov 22 '09 at 0:44
    
I don't think there is any bug in the question. –  whacko__Cracko Nov 22 '09 at 0:47
    
44 appears in the top list, that has a divisors or 2, 4, 11 and 22 so it's not quite as selective as 1, n, 2, n/2. –  Charles Bailey Nov 22 '09 at 0:49
3  
This is not true. 7 is a factor of 28, but foo(28) returns true. –  recursive Nov 22 '09 at 0:51
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It's a prime number algorithm that needs a Trac ticket.

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Can you explain a bit more ? –  whacko__Cracko Nov 22 '09 at 1:08
    
what i mean is its buggy -- if 2 characters were changed [ "for(int i=3;i<sqrt(n)+0.5;i+=2)" was edited to "for(int i=2;i<sqrt(n)+0.5;i+=1)" ] it would correctly identify prime numbers –  Scott Evernden Nov 22 '09 at 1:14
    
Thanks,but I don't think that the code is buggy. :) –  whacko__Cracko Nov 22 '09 at 2:01
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