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I have a prototype function such as event.

Prototype

Func("input_element_id").event("keyup",function(){
    alert("Works on keyup in an Input!");
}

Func.prototype= {
    keyup: function(func){
         //adding event listener and callback using func
    },
    event: function(e,func) {
         //what to do here to call function "keyup"
    }
};

The prototype name is in the variable e. But how can i call that function using the variable name?

I am doing this, so that passing "keyup keydown" will add keyup and keydown listeners, which is better than calling each prototype function individually.

Thanks.

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3 Answers 3

var Func = function(element){
  this.element = element;
};

Func.prototype = {
    keyup: function(handler){
      this.element.onkeyup = handler;
    },
    event: function(e,handler){
        switch(e){
            case 'keyup':
              return this.keyup(handler);
            break;
        }
    }
}

http://jsfiddle.net/YDekw/

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Access the receiving object with this.

this.keyup(func);

Assuming a decent browser or an ES5 shim, looks like you want to do this:

e.split(" ").forEach(function(f) {
    this[f](func);
}, this);

Note that it’s just whatever object is being used with the dot operator, though, and could be anything. For example:

var f = new Func("input_element_id");
window.event = f.event;
window.event(); // this is window
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1  
e is a string representing the property OP wants to access. You should be doing this[e](func) –  Crazy Train Jul 21 '13 at 14:55
1  
@CrazyTrain add as answer i will accept –  Hari krishnan Jul 21 '13 at 14:56
    
@CrazyTrain: Nope. –  U2744 SNOWFLAKE Jul 21 '13 at 14:56
1  
@minitechi i figured how to do when coming into spaces. But dont know how to access when that is in a variable or when e is a string representing the property OP wants to access –  Hari krishnan Jul 21 '13 at 15:01
1  
Your answer was this.keyup(func);. You simply failed to read the question. Using this was certainly part of the issue though. Either way, your .forEach() solution is incorrect. –  Crazy Train Jul 21 '13 at 15:05
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The best way to achieve this is by:

events: function(events,func) {
            this[events](func);
        }
    }

Thanks to CrazyTrain, As he mentioned in Comments.

share|improve this answer
    
So what happened to the spaces? –  U2744 SNOWFLAKE Jul 22 '13 at 14:54
    
@minitech i didnt ask question with adding spaces. I just mentioned why i am doing like this. –  Hari krishnan Jul 24 '13 at 14:25
    
To quote your question, I am doing this, so that passing "keyup keydown" will add keyup and keydown listeners, which is better than calling each prototype function individually.. That makes sense… if you just want to add an event by name, instead of making a different function for each one, I’d use element.addEventListener(singleEventName, func);. (With appropriate IE compatibility if you’d like.) Making a different function for each one is probably going to be a bit tedious. –  U2744 SNOWFLAKE Jul 24 '13 at 15:05

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