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I have a data structure, linked list, which looks like

struct listitem {
    void* data;
    struct listitem* next;
};
typedef struct listitem listitem;
typedef struct {
    listitem* head;
    pthread_rwlock_t lock;
} linkedlist;

I am using a pointer to void* for the data because I want to make the data structure polymorphic so I can use it for a few different applications.

To initialise the list (allocate memory and initialise the rw lock), I pass it to a function init_list(..). When I pass a pointer to the list as follows, the program hangs whenever I try and perform any further operations on the list (e.g. push an item to it):

int init_list(linkedlist* list /* borrowed - list to initialise (probably unallocated) */) {
    list = (linkedlist*)calloc(1, sizeof(linkedlist));    // clear the memory, so that head is a null pointer
    printf("Allocated memory\n");
    if (list == 0) {
        perror("calloc failed on allocating memory for list");
        return 1;
    }
    printf("Initialising lock\n");
    pthread_rwlock_init(&list->lock, NULL);
    return 0;
}
...
linkedlist* ll;
init_list(ll);

It is my understanding that the above should clear the memory pointed to by ll and initialise the memory location of the lock appropraitely.

When I pass a pointer to a pointer to the list, however, it all works fine (i.e. the program doesn't hang when I try and perform further operations like acquiring the lock and pushing an item to the list). I don't see why adding this extra layer of indirection makes it work. I'd have thought the operations on the actual memory locations were the same, regardless of how I referred to them?

i.e. the following works, whereas the first approach doesn't:

int init_list(linkedlist** list /* borrowed - list to initialise (probably unallocated) */) {
    *list = (linkedlist*)calloc(1, sizeof(linkedlist));    // clear the memory, so that head is a null pointer
    printf("Allocated memory\n");
    if (list == 0) {
        perror("calloc failed on allocating memory for list");
        return 1;
    }
    printf("Initialising lock\n");
    pthread_rwlock_init(&(*list)->lock, NULL);
    return 0;
}
...
linkedlist* ll;
init_list(&ll);

I can't explain why the second approach works when the first doesn't.

In terms of general style, is this approach common? Or is there a better, more common way of initialising data structures in C? I'm a relatively new C programmer and come from object oriented languages, where I'd expect to do such initialisation in a constructor, and I'm kind-of trying to copy that style in C, which - thinking about it - may not necessarily be logical?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In the first case you pushed a copy of the pointer (ll) onto the stack. Your code allocates the memory, I presume sizeof(slinkedlist) is a typo, fills it with 0,....and then discards the copy. Your caller never gets the updated pointer back. Print the value of ll after init. In the second one, you push a pointer to the pointer, which gets allocated/initialised and when you return your caller can happily use it. You can do go with the first version if instead of returning 0 or 1 you return ll and assign the return value to a variable in your caller. That would be kind of functional style.

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Thanks! I've updated my code to return a pointer to the initialised linked list rather than return 0 or 1 as it currently does. –  Froskoy Jul 21 '13 at 15:59

In the first version, what you are doing is allocating a new piece of memory, zeroing it, and copying it to the list parameter (this DOES NOT CHANGE ll since C sends parameters by values). The second version has *list, with list being a pointer to ll, which means that when you change *list you actually change ll (unlike the first verson).

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