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I was wondering if someone could help me with chaining joins - I'm not understanding the thought process.

An example with three tables:

ArticleCategories
-----------------
CategoryID
CategoryName

Articles
---------
ArticleID
ArticleText
CategoryID (FK)

ArticleComments
-----------------
CommentID
ArticleID (FK)
CommentText

I have an sp to get article info for all articles of a particular category, including a count of comments for an article, but I think it needs improvement. My struggle has resulted in this:


With resultSet AS
(
  select
    a.ArticleID
  , a.ArticleText
  , a.CategoryID
  , c.CommentCount
    from Articles a
    Left Outer Join
    (Select count(c.CommentID) as CommentCount, c.ArticleID
     from Comments c    
     Group BY c.ArticleID
    ) c
    on a.ArticleID = c.ArticleID 
)
select * from resultSet
where resultSet.CategoryID = 2


How should I have written this? I was looking for a way to eliminate the resultSet and the select on the resultSet.

Thanks much for any help Bill

share|improve this question
    
Thanks again, all, for answering. For anyone else having a little trouble with Group BY, (why every column in the select has to be part of the group by), here's a great discussion : weblogs.sqlteam.com/jeffs/archive/2007/07/20/60261.aspx -BillB –  BillB Nov 22 '09 at 17:31

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your query with the WITH clause removed:

   SELECT a.articleid,
          a.articletext,
          a.categoryid,
          COALESCE(c.commentcount, 0) AS commentcount,
     FROM ARTICLES a
LEFT JOIN (SELECT c.articleid,
                  COUNT(c.commentid) AS commentcount
             FROM COMMENTS c    
         GROUP BY c.articleid) c ON c.articleid = a.articleid
   WHERE a.categoryid = 2

I added the COALESCE to handle when an article has no comments - it's safe in both Oracle and SQL Server though you didn't mention which you are using. To my knowledge, it could only be SQL Server, Oracle or DB2 because of the WITH clause.

share|improve this answer
    
OMG Ponies - Thanks for including Coalesce - didn't know that existed and it's very helpful. I see it's available in MySQL too. Also, your name cracks me up. –  BillB Nov 22 '09 at 16:25
    
I like this answer because it doesn't rely on column names in the group by that really don't belong there. I found a link with says that if you're putting column names in a group by just because they're in the Select, you're doing something that's more difficult to read, if not just bad form. Here's a long discussion, where the author of the original post defends himself well: weblogs.sqlteam.com/jeffs/archive/2005/12/14/8546.aspx –  BillB Nov 22 '09 at 21:45
select a.articleid, count(c.*) as commentcount
from articles a
left join articlecomments c on a.articleid = c.articleid
where a.categoryid = @categoryid
group by a.articleid
share|improve this answer

If I'm understanding you right you're just after something like:

SELECT
    a.ArticleID,
    a.ArticleText,
    a.CategoryID,
    (select count(*) from comments c where c.articleid=a.articleid)
FROM
    article a
WHERE
    a.categoryid=2

OR

SELECT
    a.ArticleID,
    a.ArticleText,
    a.CategoryID,
    count(c.commentid)
FROM
    article a
    left outer join comment c on c.articleid=a.articleid
WHERE
    a.categoryid=2
GROUP BY
    a.ArticleID,
    a.ArticleText,
    a.CategoryID
share|improve this answer
    
I like the first one for it's clarity. - Billb –  BillB Nov 22 '09 at 18:18

Close ....

You can take the inner select out:

select a.ArticleID , a.ArticleText , a.CategoryID , count(c.CommentCount) 
from Articles a
left join Comments c on a.articleid=c.articleid
where articleid=2
group by a.ArticleID , a.ArticleText , a.CategoryID
share|improve this answer
    
This works because there are functional dependencies ArticleID=>ArticleText and ArticleID=>CategoryID so grouping doesn't create any new (sub)groups. However, from semantics point of view, you don't really want to group by anything except for ArticleID –  Dmitry Nov 22 '09 at 1:24
    
Dmitry, thanks for jumping in and adding the clarification on the group by - that's what was confusing me the most. It still is acutally, if I'm reading you right: we have to add the ArticleID and ArticleText to the group by just to satisfy the DB Engine, (compiler), while reducing the clarity of the intent. I'll have to read more about the Group By. –  BillB Nov 22 '09 at 16:33

He's the process I go through when building queries:

First, what's the primary driving table? For you, you're getting information about articles, so that suggest's the articles table:

select * from articles

Next, what other tables do I need to pull in, and are these required tables, to get the rest of the information that I need? You need ArticleComments, which is optional:

select
  *
from
  Articles a
  left join ArticleComments acomm on acomm.ArticleID = a.ArticleID

And now, what data do I actually need this query to return? (And also mixed in, just to save a step, what selection criteria do I need?)

select
  a.ArticleID,
  a.ArticleText,
  a.CategoryID,
  count(c.*) CommentCount
from
  Articles a
  left join ArticleComments acomm on acomm.ArticleID = a.ArticleID
where
  a.CategoryID = @CatID
group by
  a.ArticleID

Just break it down, one step at a time, and work through where you need to get data from, and what data you need.

share|improve this answer
    
Donnie, thanks for the description of your thought process - that was what I was really looking for. If the code worked without tweaking, I'd have checked your response. –  BillB Nov 22 '09 at 16:27

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