Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We have three web services (/a, /b, /c) where each service maps to a method (go()) in a separate Java class (ClassA, ClassB, ClassC).

Only one service should run at the same time (ie: /b cannot run while /a is running). However as this is a REST API there is nothing to prevent clients from requesting the services run concurrently.

What is the best and most simple method on the server to enforce that the services don't run concurrently?


Update: This is an internal app, we will not have a large load and will just have a single app server.

Update: This is a subjective question as you can make different arguments on the general application design which affects the final answer. Accepted overthink's answer as I found that most interesting and helpful.

share|improve this question
2  
@Marcus: it may well be an internal app, but designing something with built-in limitations at this stage is a bad idea. You may think it will never need to scale, but can you be sure? Save yourself the headache later down the line and adhere to some best practice! –  jkp Nov 22 '09 at 3:52
    
@jkp, Point taken. –  Marcus Nov 22 '09 at 5:35
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Assuming it's not ok to just force the web server to have only one listening thread serving requests... I suppose I'd just use a static lock (ReentrantLock probably, for clarity, though you could sync on any shared object, really):

public class Global {
  public static final Lock webLock = new ReentrantLock();
}

public class ClassA {
    public void go() {
        Global.webLock.lock()
        try {
            // do A stuff
        } finally {
            Global.webLock.unlock()
        }
    }
}

public class ClassB {
    public void go() {
        Global.webLock.lock()
        try {
            // do B stuff
        } finally {
            Global.webLock.unlock()
        }
    }
}

public class ClassC {
    public void go() {
        Global.webLock.lock()
        try {
            // do C stuff
        } finally {
            Global.webLock.unlock()
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
@overthink: What happens when he wants more service tiers? This solution won't scale if the locks are implemented on those tiers. –  jkp Nov 22 '09 at 3:48
    
@overthink: So you're saying you could also use synchronized(sharedObject) {...} blocks instead of the Global.webLock.lock()/unlock() statements? –  Marcus Nov 22 '09 at 5:36
    
@Marcus: Yes, you could use synchronized instead of lock/unlock. e.g. in my example above you could make webLock a simple Object and use synchronized(webLock) {...} instead. –  overthink Nov 23 '09 at 1:43
    
@jkp: I'm not attempting to give design advice; just answering the question as it was asked. You're correct that this wouldn't work if there are multiple web servers involved. –  overthink Nov 23 '09 at 1:53
add comment

Firstly, without knowing your architecture, you are probably going to run into issues if you have to enforce concurrency restrictions on the WebService tiers. Whilst you could use traditional locks etc to serialise the requests accross both services, what happens when you add a second web tier to scale your solution? If the locks are local to the web layer they will be next to useless.

I'm guessing there is probably a layer of some sort that sits below the Web services and it's here you need to enforce these restrictions. If client B comes in after client A has made a conflicting request, then the backend should reject the request when it finds out the state has changed and you should then return a 409 to the second client. In the end race conditions are still possible but you have to have your lowest common layer protect your from conflicting requests.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your design is flawed. The services should be idempotent. If the classes you have don't support that, redesign them until they do. Sounds like each of the three methods should be the basis for the services, not the classes.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you elaborate? –  Marcus Nov 22 '09 at 4:04
    
The only reason I can see for preventing the go() method in class A, B, and C from running concurrently is that they're sharing something. If that's class data or database data, you should try to redesign so they share nothing. That would allow them to run concurrently and not worry about interfering. If that's not possible, then you should have one service that calls them in proper sequence to ensure that they can't be called out of order. In either case, I think your design is flawed and the cure will be worse than the disease. –  duffymo Nov 22 '09 at 4:09
    
+100 if I could. There is a big problem somewhere in the design and semaphores, locks, etc are not the way to solve this. –  Pascal Thivent Nov 22 '09 at 13:07
    
Point taken.. this entire process involves a financial calculation. C is the final calculation run at the end of the day. A uploads some settings which can be done any time and B is an intermediate set of calculations that are done mid day. So normal operations these 3 functions will never happen at the same time. But to be thorough we want to ensure they don't happen at the same time. –  Marcus Nov 22 '09 at 16:19
    
Sounds to me like A is the only service here. The other two sound more like batch jobs that are kicked off at a particular time. The only concern you'd have with that approach is making sure that they finished within their appointed window. If that's a fair summary, I'd recommend looking at Spring Batch: static.springsource.org/spring-batch –  duffymo Nov 22 '09 at 17:02
show 1 more comment

You could use a semaphore of some kind to keep access across services serial.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Why not use hypermedia to constrain access?

Use something like,

POST /A

to initate the first process. The when it is complete the results should provide a link to follow to initiate the second process,

<ResultsOfProcessA>
  <Status>Complete</Status>
  <ProcessB href="/B"/>
</ResultsOfProcessA>

Follow the link to initate the second process,

POST /B

and repeat for part C.

Arguably a badly behaving client could cache the link to step B and attempt to re-use it in some future request to circumvent the sequence. However, it would not be too difficult to assign some kind of token when doing step A and require that the token be passed to step B and C to prevent the client from constructing the URL manually.

Reading your comments further, it seems that you have a situation where A could be run either before or after B. In this case I would suggest creating a resource D that represents the status of the entire set of processes (A,B and C). When a client retrieves D it is presented with the URIs that it is allowed to follow. Once a client has initiated the A process then the D resource should remove the B link for the duration of the processing. The opposite should occur when B is initiated before A.

The other advantage of this technique is that it is obvious if A or B has been run for the day as the status can be displayed in D. Once A and B have been run then D can contain a link for C.

The hypermedia is not a 100% foolproof solution because you could have two clients with the same copy of D and both might think that process A has not been run and both could attempt to run it simultaneously. This could be addressed by having some kind of "Last Modified" timestamp on D and you could update that timestamp whenever the status of D changes. This could allow the later request to be denied. Based on the description of your scenario it would seem that this is more of an edge case and the hypermedia would catch most attempts to run processes in parallel.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.