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I come from a sql background and I use the following data processing step frequently:

  1. Partition the table of data by one or more fields
  2. For each partition, add a rownumber to each of its rows that ranks the row by one or more other fields, where the analyst specifies ascending or descending

EX:

df = pd.DataFrame({'key1' : ['a','a','a','b','a'],
           'data1' : [1,2,2,3,3],
           'data2' : [1,10,2,3,30]})
df
     data1        data2     key1    
0    1            1         a           
1    2            10        a        
2    2            2         a       
3    3            3         b       
4    3            30        a        

I'm looking for how to do the PANDAS equivalent to this sql window function:

RN = ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY Key1, Key2 ORDER BY Data1 ASC, Data2 DESC)


    data1        data2     key1    RN
0    1            1         a       1    
1    2            10        a       2 
2    2            2         a       3
3    3            3         b       1
4    3            30        a       4

I've tried the following which I've gotten to work where there are no 'partitions':

def row_number(frame,orderby_columns, orderby_direction,name):
    frame.sort_index(by = orderby_columns, ascending = orderby_direction, inplace = True)
    frame[name] = list(xrange(len(frame.index)))

I tried to extend this idea to work with partitions (groups in pandas) but the following didn't work:

df1 = df.groupby(key1').apply(lambda t: t.sort_index(by=['data1', 'data2'], ascending=[True, False], inplace = True)).reset_index()

def nf(x):
    x['rn'] = list(xrange(len(x.index)))

df1['rn1'] = df1.groupby('key1').apply(nf)

But I just got a lot of NaNs when I do this.

Ideally, there'd be a succinct way to replicate the window function capability of sql (i've figured out the window based aggregates...that's a one liner in pandas)...can someone share with me the most idiomatic way to number rows like this in PANDAS?

share|improve this question
    
seems like you ought to be able to .rank by multiple columns... – Andy Hayden Jul 21 '13 at 21:15
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can do this by using groupby twice along with the rank method:

In [11]: g = df.groupby('key1')

Use the min method argument to give values which share the same data1 the same RN:

In [12]: g['data1'].rank(method='min')
Out[12]:
0    1
1    2
2    2
3    1
4    4
dtype: float64

In [13]: df['RN'] = g['data1'].rank(method='min')

And then groupby these results and add the rank with respect to data2:

In [14]: g1 = df.groupby(['key1', 'RN'])

In [15]: g1['data2'].rank(ascending=False) - 1
Out[15]:
0    0
1    0
2    1
3    0
4    0
dtype: float64

In [16]: df['RN'] += g1['data2'].rank(ascending=False) - 1

In [17]: df
Out[17]:
   data1  data2 key1  RN
0      1      1    a   1
1      2     10    a   2
2      2      2    a   3
3      3      3    b   1
4      3     30    a   4

It feels like there ought to be a native way to do this (there may well be!...).

share|improve this answer
    
i agree, ranking by multiple columns seems natural...should I request it on github? – AllenQ Jul 21 '13 at 21:55
    
also thanks a lot for the workaround! – AllenQ Jul 21 '13 at 21:55
    
@AllenQ already did github.com/pydata/pandas/issues/4311 :) – Andy Hayden Jul 21 '13 at 22:49

pandas.lib.fast_zip() can create a tuple array from a list of array. You can use this function to create a tuple series, and then rank it:

values = {'key1' : ['a','a','a','b','a','b'],
          'data1' : [1,2,2,3,3,3],
          'data2' : [1,10,2,3,30,20]}

df = pd.DataFrame(values, index=list("abcdef"))

def rank_multi_columns(df, cols, **kw):
    data = []
    for col in cols:
        if col.startswith("-"):
            flag = -1
            col = col[1:]
        else:
            flag = 1
        data.append(flag*df[col])
    values = pd.lib.fast_zip(data)
    s = pd.Series(values, index=df.index)
    return s.rank(**kw)

rank = df.groupby("key1").apply(lambda df:rank_multi_columns(df, ["data1", "-data2"]))

print rank

the result:

a    1
b    2
c    3
d    2
e    4
f    1
dtype: float64
share|improve this answer

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