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When I run gprof on my C program it says no time accumulated for my program and shows 0 time for all function calls. However it does count the function calls.

How do I modify my program so that gprof will be able to count how much time something takes to run?

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Does your program actually consume any CPU time? And are you running it on Linux or on cygwin? –  Employed Russian Nov 22 '09 at 2:55
    
Yes, the program takes a while to complete. I tried running it on both Linux and Cygwin. –  neuromancer Nov 22 '09 at 3:08
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4 Answers 4

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Did you specify -pg when compiling?

http://sourceware.org/binutils/docs-2.20/gprof/Compiling.html#Compiling

Once it is compiled, you run the program and then run gprof on the binary.

E.g.:

test.c:

#include <stdio.h>

int main ()
{
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < 10000; i++) {
        printf ("%d\n", i);
    }
    return 0;
}

Compile as cc -pg test.c, then run as a.out, then gprof a.out, gives me

granularity: each sample hit covers 4 byte(s) for 1.47% of 0.03 seconds

  %   cumulative   self              self     total           
 time   seconds   seconds    calls  ms/call  ms/call  name    
 45.6       0.02     0.02    10000     0.00     0.00  __sys_write [10]
 45.6       0.03     0.02        0  100.00%           .mcount (26)
  2.9       0.03     0.00    20000     0.00     0.00  __sfvwrite [6]
  1.5       0.03     0.00    20000     0.00     0.00  memchr [11]
  1.5       0.03     0.00    10000     0.00     0.00  __ultoa [12]
  1.5       0.03     0.00    10000     0.00     0.00  _swrite [9]
  1.5       0.03     0.00    10000     0.00     0.00  vfprintf [2]

What are you getting?

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Yes I used the -pg option –  neuromancer Nov 22 '09 at 3:05
2  
@Phenom: In that case, I have no suggestions whatsoever based on what you've chosen to share. You'll have to tell us something more than that it's a C program, compiled with -pg, and you get function counts but no CPU time. Are you sure you're consuming CPU time, rather than running up wall clock time with I/O calls? –  David Thornley Dec 18 '09 at 22:45
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One gotcha with gprof: it doesn't work with code in dynamically-linked libraries. For that, you need to use sprof. See this answer: gprof : How to generate call graph for functions in shared library that is linked to main program

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I tried running Kinopiko's example, except I increased the number of iterations by a factor of 100.

test.c:

#include <stdio.h>

int main ()
{
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < 1000000; i++) {
        printf ("%d\n", i);
    }
    return 0;
}

Then I took 10 stackshots (under VC, but you can use pstack). Here are the stackshots:

9 copies of this stack:
NTDLL! 7c90e514()
KERNEL32! 7c81cbfe()
KERNEL32! 7c81cc75()
KERNEL32! 7c81cc89()
_write() line 168 + 57 bytes
_flush() line 162 + 23 bytes
_ftbuf() line 171 + 9 bytes
printf() line 62 + 14 bytes
main() line 7 + 14 bytes
mainCRTStartup() line 206 + 25 bytes
KERNEL32! 7c817077()

1 copy of this stack:
KERNEL32! 7c81cb96()
KERNEL32! 7c81cc75()
KERNEL32! 7c81cc89()
_write() line 168 + 57 bytes
_flush() line 162 + 23 bytes
_ftbuf() line 171 + 9 bytes
printf() line 62 + 14 bytes
main() line 7 + 14 bytes
mainCRTStartup() line 206 + 25 bytes
KERNEL32! 7c817077()

In case it isn't obvious, this tells you that:

mainCRTStartup() line 206 + 25 bytes Cost ~100% of the time
main() line 7 + 14 bytes             Cost ~100% of the time
printf() line 62 + 14 bytes          Cost ~100% of the time
_ftbuf() line 171 + 9 bytes          Cost ~100% of the time
_flush() line 162 + 23 bytes         Cost ~100% of the time
_write() line 168 + 57 bytes         Cost ~100% of the time

In a nutshell, the program spends ~100% of it's time flushing to disk (or console) the output buffer as part of the printf on line 7.

(What I mean by "Cost of a line" is - it is the fraction of total time spent at the request of that line, and that's roughly the fraction of samples that contain it. If that line could be made to take no time, such as by removing it, skipping over it, or passing its work off to an infinitely fast coprocessor, that time fraction is how much the total time would shrink. So if the execution of any of these lines of code could be avoided, time would shrink by somewhere in the range of 95% to 100%. If you were to ask "What about recursion?", the answer is It Makes No Difference.)

Now, maybe you want to know something else, like how much time is spent in the loop, for example. To find that out, remove the printf because it's hogging all the time. Maybe you want to know what % of time is spent purely in CPU time, not in system calls. To get that, just throw away any stackshots that don't end in your code.

The point I'm trying to make is if you're looking for things you can fix to make the code run faster, the data gprof gives you, even if you understand it, is almost useless. By comparison, if there is some of your code that is causing more wall-clock time to be spent than you would like, stackshots will pinpoint it.

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First compile you application with -g, and check what CPU counters are you using. If your application runs very quick than gprof could just miss all events or less that required (reduce the number of events to read).

Actually profiling should show you CPU_CLK_UNHALTED or INST_RETIRED events without any special switches. But with such data you'll be able only to say how well your code it performing: INST_RETIRED/CPU_CLK_UNHALTED.

Try to use Intel VTune profiler - it's free for 30 days and for education.

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