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On one PHP server I have two files. One file (the name is "first.php") contains this code:

<html>
<head>
<title>First Page</title>
</head>
<body>
Please enter your password and age:
<form action="pass.php" method="post">
Name: <input type="text" name="fname" />
Age: <input type="text" name="age" />
<input type="submit" />
</form>
</body>
</html>

The other file ("pass.php") contains this code:

<html>
<head>
<title>Secon Page</title>
</head>
<body>
<?php
if ($fname=="Jack")
  echo "You are Jack!";
else
  echo "You are not Jack!";
?>
</body>
</html>

As far as I understand, if a user enters "Jack" in the first page, than the second page should be displayed with "You are Jack!" line, but it doesn't happen. Why is it so?

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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

On your second page, instead of checking for $fname, check for $_POST['fname'] instead. I think that is all you are missing.

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Thank you!!! It works now!!! –  brilliant Nov 22 '09 at 3:53
    
You're very welcome. I hope your future php endeavors go well! –  darthnosaj Nov 22 '09 at 3:58
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You probably don't have register_globals set. This is depreciated and will be removed in 6.x. So for good programming you should instead of $fname try $_POST['fname'] on your second page.

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pass.php needs to look like this

<html>
<head>
<title>Secon Page</title>
</head>
<body>
<?php
if ($_POST['fname'] =="Jack")
  echo "You are Jack!";
else
  echo "You are not Jack!";
?>
</body>
</html>
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Thank you very much. –  brilliant Nov 22 '09 at 14:34
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It might help to set the post values as variables and work with that. Something like this:

foreach($_POST as $key => $value)
{
  $$key = $value;
}

Then whatever is posted will be available rather than using $_POST['xxxxx'] in your logic.

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This is an even worse idea than register_globals, as it can overwrite any variables you have used in your script previously. And you'll still get loads of warnings for variables that aren't passed in. –  bobince Nov 22 '09 at 4:07
    
Yes, it can overwrite variables previously set, but you can do that anywhere. Naming is one of the most difficult aspects of programming! However, I would rather not be repeating myself with $_POST['key'] throughout my logic. –  chris Dec 22 '09 at 18:43
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