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I'm a little confused about accessor's in C#. I assumed something like this could be done for private accessor's:

private string m_name =
{
    get { return m_name; } // Not sure if this is actually correct. Maybe use 'this'
    set { m_name = value } // Not even sure if this is correct
} 

I'm not sure if the code above is valid. I've not used accessors in C#.

Instead, documentation states to do this:

class Employee
{
     private string m_name;

     public string Name
     {
         get { return m_name; }
         protected set { m_name = value; }
      }
}

Why is this done, because from my perspective the user can still access the private m_name property via Name. Doesn't this defeat the point of private (or even protected) properties?

In the first example shouldn't the compiler know its private and thus create the methods behind the scenes (as I believe it does at compile time)?

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No,with protected outside the class with a instance of employee.name you cant. –  terrybozzio Jul 21 '13 at 23:19
1  
this would be great for you,this msdn article and the subsequent ones on the left menu - msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/w86s7x04.aspx –  terrybozzio Jul 21 '13 at 23:23

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your first example will give you a StackOverflowException, you need to either use a separate member to store your data or use Auto Properties.

To answer your question, The reason this is done is to effectively make the property readonly to everyone outside of the class, but allow any code running inside the class to still set the property.

class Employee
{
     public Employee(string name)
     {
         Name = name;
     }

     private string m_name;

     public string Name
     {
         get { return m_name; }
         protected set { m_name = value; }
     }

     public void ChangeName(string name)
     {
         Name = name;
     }
}

public class Ceo : Employee
{
    public Ceo(string name) : base(name)
    {
    }

    public void VoteOut()
    {
         Name = Name + " (FIRED)";
    }
}


static class MainClass
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var employee = new Employee("Scott Chamberlain");

        Console.WriteLine(employee.Name) //Displays Scott Chamberlain;

        //employee.Name = "James Jeffery"; //Has a complier error if uncommented because Name is not writeable to MainClass, only members of Employee can write to it.

        employee.ChangeName("James Jeffery");

        Console.WriteLine(employee.Name) //Displays James Jeffery;
    }
}
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1  
The readonly factor is nice, but an even bigger benefit is encapsulation. How you determine Name can be flexible. –  Guvante Jul 21 '13 at 23:20
    
So why not setter is private instead of protected? –  Kashif Jul 21 '13 at 23:29
    
@Kashif If you every wanted to make a derived class who also needed to set the value. See my update with the new Ceo class. It adds the text (FIRED) on the end of the Name Property from the base Employee class. If Name was private Ceo could only read Name not set it to a new value. –  Scott Chamberlain Jul 21 '13 at 23:36
    
Thanks @ScottChamberlain! –  Kashif Jul 21 '13 at 23:47

There's a shorthand which most people use instead:

class Employee
{ 

     public string Name
     {
         get;
         protected set;
     }
}

More specifically, though, no. It doesn't. private, protected, and public refer to the visibility of the variable from other classes, not from inside the class you're writing.

private - Any method or property accessor in this class, but no others, can use this item.

protected - Same as above, but methods or accessors in derived classes can see the variable too.

public - Can be seen anywhere in your program from any class.

internal - Same as public, but only inside your currently compiled assembly.

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It'll depend entirely on the context in which you're consuming that property.

For example, a pattern I will often use is something like the following.

public class MyClass
{
    public MyClass(object myPropertyValue)
    {
        this.MyProperty = myPropertyValue;
    }

    public object MyProperty { get; private set; }
}

In that example, the idea is that the MyProperty value should be defined when the object is created, but never changed after the fact. Making the set accessor private ensures that neither myself nor anyone else accidentally set the value elsewhere in their code.

The protected accessor means that subclasses of Employee could set the property too. My private set on MyClass.MyProperty means that subclasses of MyClass could not set that property value.

Note that in your case, the private variable may also be redundant. It depends on where else it might be in use.

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In the example given you are explicitly defining the backing field as m_name. You can have the compiler auto-generate the methods, but you need to use a different syntax.

private string m_name { get; set; }

One of the disconnects you are seeing is that the example you are listing provides the following access to consumers of the class:

  • Backing field - private
  • Getting the value - public
  • Setting the value - private
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Basically, Accessors will define what members or variables you will allow to be accessed. Yes, some class can define a specific value for that member but it cannot directly access the said member variable.

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