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I have a file, list.txt, like this:

cat
bear
tree
catfish
fish
bear

I need to delete any lines which are already fully found somewhere else in the document, either as a duplicate line, or found within another longer line. For e.g., the lines "bear" and "bear" are the same, so one of these is deleted; "cat" can be found completely within "catfish", so "cat" is deleted. The output would look like this:

catfish
tree
bear

How can I delete all duplicate lines including the lines which are found within longer lines in a list?

So far, I have this:

#!/bin/bash
touch list.tmp
while read -r line
do
    found="$(grep -c $line list.tmp)"
    if [ "$found" -eq "1" ]
    then
        echo $line >> list.tmp
        echo $line" added"
    else
        echo "Not added."
fi
done < list.txt
share|improve this question
    
What do you have so far? –  ruakh Jul 22 '13 at 0:01
    
Incidentally, your code will also fail if a word occurs more than once (think "fish" in "shellfish","catfish"). The proper way to check that is simply if grep -q "$line" list.tmp; then ... –  tripleee Jul 22 '13 at 3:38

6 Answers 6

If O(N^2) doesn't bother you:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use List::MoreUtils qw{any};

my @words;
for my $word (
    sort {length $b <=> length $a}
    do {
        my %words;
        my @words = <>;
        chomp @words;
        @words{@words} = ();
        keys %words;
    }
)
{
    push @words, $word unless do {
        my $re = qr/\Q$word/;
        any {m/$re/} @words;
    };
}

print "$_\n" for @words;

If you would like O(NlogN) you have to use some sort of trie approach. For example using suffix tree:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use Tree::Suffix;

my $tree = Tree::Suffix->new();

my @words;
for my $word (
    sort {length $b <=> length $a}
    do {
        my %words;
        my @words = <>;
        chomp @words;
        @words{@words} = ();
        keys %words;
    }
)
{
    unless ($tree->find($word)){
        push @words, $word;
        $tree->insert($word);
    };
}

print "$_\n" for @words;
share|improve this answer

I can think of one fairly good algorithm. I will answer in Perl to keep the result sufficiently efficient.

For each word, test if it is a substring of any word in the set of larger words. If not, remove all those words from the set that are substrings of this word, and add the word to the set.

Because this generally implies looping through all values, we might as well use an array. To speed things up, we keep the array sorted in decreasing size. This allows us to test against each word already in the set exactly once.

use strict; use warnings;

my @words;
INPUT:
while (<>) {
  chomp;
  my $len = length;
  my $i = 0;

  # check larger words if they contain $_
  LARGER:
  for ( ; $i < @words ; $i++) {
    last LARGER if length $words[$i] < $len;
    next INPUT if 0 <= index $words[$i], $_; # the word was seen
  }

  # insert the new word
  splice @words, $i++, 0, $_;

  # remove words that are contained in new word
  for ( ; $i < @words ; $i++) {
    splice @words, $i--, 1 if 0 <= index $_, $words[$i]; # $i-- adjusts index for deletion
  }
}
print "$_\n" for @words;

The 0 <= index $a, $b is an efficient way to write $a =~ /\Q$b\E/.

This is a generalisation of David W.'s algorithm. If the input is sorted in decreasing wordlength, then both implementations produce the same output.


If the words are rather short, but there are many different words, it may be preferable to remember all possible substrings. This allows us to quickly detect a word as seen, but makes it expensive to add a word to the known list.

my %seen;  # used to detect seen words
my %words; # used to remember real words
while (<>) {
  chomp;
  next if exists $seen{$_};
  # so we didn't see it. Let's produce all substrings
  START: for (my $start = 0 ; $start < length() - 1 ; $start++) {
    LENGTH: for (my $length = length() - $start ; $length ; $length--) {
      my $substr = substr $_, $start, $length;
      delete $words{$substr};         # if this was a real word, it's now a substring
      last LENGTH if exists $seen{$substr};  # dont repeat yourself
      $seen{$substr} = undef;         # add the entry
    }
  }
  $words{$_} = undef;  # remember this word as a real word
}
undef %seen;  # free obscene amount of memory
print "$_\n" for keys %words;
share|improve this answer

This requires two passes to the file but should work:

Content of script.awk

NR==FNR {
  words[$1]++
  next
} 
{
  for (word in words) { 
    if (index ($1,word) == 0) { 
      words[word] 
    } 
    else { 
      delete words[word]
      words[$1] 
    } 
  }
}
END {
  for (left in words)
    print left
}

Test:

$ cat file
cat
bear
tree
catfish
fish
bear
$ awk -f script.awk file file
bear
catfish
tree
share|improve this answer
    
You can move all the processing to the END block and get away with a single I/O pass over the file itself. Processing is still two-pass, and you end up with the whole file in memory, but you can get around that by sorting by length if the input is really big. –  tripleee Jul 22 '13 at 3:45
    
Thanks @tripleee, yeah, that's a valid and good point. –  jaypal Jul 22 '13 at 3:57

This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed -r ':a;$!{N;ba};s/\b([^\n]+)\n(.*\1)/\2/;ta;s/(([^\n]+).*\n)(\2)\n?/\1/;ta' file

Slurp the file in memory, then delete single words which are repeated both forwards and backwards throughout the file.

share|improve this answer
    
I love it ++ ! –  captcha Jul 22 '13 at 21:16

Because of the substrings issue, this is going to be pretty difficult. Originally, I was thinking of sorting my list and things like cat and catfish will fall out next to each other, but look at this list::

bug
bear
calf
catbug
catbear

Sorting this list won't help. Plus, what about this?

concatenate
cat
bear
bug

Do I leave out cat? It is already in the word concatenate?

What about this:

cat
concatenate
bear
bug

In this case, both the words cat and concatenate are in the list because cat is first in the list before concatenate. Since there's no word that's already part of concatenate, it goes into the list.

Unless I need to check both ways. Is the word I want to add to the list in a word that's already in the list and is the word already in the list contained in the word I'm looking at.

This is not only a poorly defined problem, but a mess to code. Coding is actually pretty simple, but it ends up making a O2 type algorithm. This means that doubling the size of the list results in quadrupling the amount of time to process. If I can process 100 words in one second, it will take me 4 seconds to do 200 words, 8 seconds to do 400 words, 16 seconds to do 800 words. Almost 20 seconds to do 1000 words.

Here's using your definition where order does matter. That is, if cat comes before catbug, both are in your approved list, but if catbug comes before cat, then cat won't make the list:

#! /usr/bin/env perl
#
use strict;
use warnings;
use autodie;
use feature qw(say);
use Data::Dumper;

use constant {
    LIST_FILE => "text.txt",
};

open my $list_fh, "<", LIST_FILE;
my @approved_list;
while ( my $new_word = <list_fh> ) {
    chomp $new_word;
    my $new_word_in_list = 0;
    for my $word_already_in_list ( @approved_list ) {
        if ( $word_already_in_list =~ /\Q$new_word\E/ ) {
            # Word is already in the list or in a word in the list
            $new_word_in_list = 1;
            last;
        }
    }
    if ( not $new_word_in_list ) {
        push @approved_list, $new_word;
    }
}
say Dumper \@approved_list;

Deep Thought

I realized earlier that I could use grep instead of an inner loop:

#! /usr/bin/env perl
#
use strict;
use warnings;
use autodie;
use feature qw(say);
use Data::Dumper;

use constant {
    LIST_FILE => "text.txt",
};

open my $list_fh, "<", LIST_FILE;
my @approved_list;
while ( my $new_word = <$list_fh> ) {
    chomp $new_word;
    if ( not grep { /\Q$new_word\E/ } @approved_list ) {
        push @approved_list, $new_word;
    }
}
say Dumper \@approved_list

The program looks shorter and it appears that only a single loop is needed, but the grep is hiding the inner loop. For the grep to work, it still needs to go through each and every entry in the array. This is why I decided not to use grep, but to make the inner loop more explicit.

However, what if I could use a string to keep the words instead of an array, and I separate out the words with some character I could guarantee that's not in the words? Maybe I could use a regular expression on a string. Would that be more efficient?

#! /usr/bin/env perl
#
use strict;
use warnings;
use autodie;
use feature qw(say);
use Data::Dumper;

use constant {
    LIST_FILE => "text.txt",
};

open my $list_fh, "<", LIST_FILE;
my $approved_list = "";
while ( my $new_word = <$list_fh> ) {
    chomp $new_word;
    if ( not $approved_list =~ /\Q$new_word\E/ ) {
        $approved_list = ( $approved_list ) ? "$approved_list\0$new_word" : $new_word;
    }
}
say Dumper split /\0/, $approved_list;

In the above, I am putting the approved list of words in a scalar called $approved_list. I separate the words with the NUL character on the assumption that the words won't contain the NUL character. Now, I can grep the scalar with the new word. If it's not already in the $approved_list, I append it with the NUL character (\0) preceding it. I can later split on NUL to return a list again.

Will using regular expressions be faster? What if my approved list contains 1000 words averaging 5 characters a piece (probably longer since longer words are more likely than shorter words). That's a 6000 character string I'm doing a regular expression on. Is that more efficient? It's hard to say.

There are three solutions:

  1. The first which uses an implicit inner loop.
  2. The second which uses grep to hide the inner loop.
  3. The third which strings together the word list into a single string separated by a character I am absolutely sure is not in the string. (My money is on NUL).

The only way to tell is to use something like Benchmark::Timer on all three and see which one is the most efficient -- which could change depending upon list size, words, etc.

share|improve this answer
    
If you sort by length, like in @Amon's answer, you avoid the problem of comparing both ways. –  tripleee Jul 22 '13 at 3:41
    
@tripleee If order isn't important, Sorting on length will avoid the order issue. –  David W. Jul 22 '13 at 3:48

Just for fun, here is a shell script version. I cheat by using Perl to print the line length, though.

#!/bin/sh

touch list.tmp

# Schwartzian transform: add length as prefix for each line,
perl -nle 'print length, "\t", $_' list.txt |
# reverse sort by this prefix,
sort -rn |
# and discard the prefix
cut -f2- |
while read -r line; do
     grep -q "$line" list.tmp && continue
     echo "$line" >>list.tmp
done
share|improve this answer

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