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I'm writing a simple code to calculate how much change is due, with print statements thrown in to check my values.

cost = float(raw_input('How much did your meal cost? > '))
payment = float(raw_input('How much did you pay? > '))

change = (payment - cost)

print change

if change < 0:
    print 'You need to pay $%.2f more!' %  (-change)

dollars, q, d, n, p = 0, 0, 0, 0, 0

change = float(change*100)

print change

if change> 100:
    dollars = int(change/100)
    change = change % 100
    print change

if change >= 25:
    q = int(change/25)
    change = change % 25
    print change

if change >= 10:
    d = int(change/10)
    change = change % 10
    print change

if change >= 5:
    n = int(change/5)
    change = change % 5
    print change    

if change >= 1:
    p = int(change/1)
else:
    print "why doesn't this work?"
    print p
    print change

print 'you get %d dollars, %d quarters, %d dimes, %d nickels, and %d pennies!' % (dollars, q, d, n, p)

This returns:

How much did your meal cost? > 34.34

How much did you pay? > 40

5.66

566.0

66.0

16.0

6.0

1.0

why doesn't this work?

0

1.0

I can see that change = 1.0 before and after the pennies calculation, but

if change >= 1

still reads as false, and goes to the else statement. What's happening here and how can I fix it?

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To see what's going on, add this print statement at the end: print '%8.20f' % change. –  FMc Jul 22 '13 at 3:17
1  
By the by, shouldn't the dollars case use >= just like the others? –  tripleee Jul 22 '13 at 3:32

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It's exactly as ignacio says. The easy fix would just be to throw in a line to round change to the second decimal place. Using a function to simplify things a little bit, your code becomes:

def get_change_and_coin(coin_amount, change):
    change = round(change, 2)
    return (change % coin_amount, int(change / coin_amount))


cost = float(raw_input('How much did your meal cost? > '))
payment = float(raw_input('How much did you pay? > '))

change = (payment - cost)

print change

if change < 0:
    print 'You need to pay $%.2f more!' %  (-change)

dollars, q, d, n, p = 0, 0, 0, 0, 0

dollars = int(change)
change = float(change*100)

(change, q) = get_change_and_coin(25, change)
(change, d) = get_change_and_coin(10, change)
(change, n) = get_change_and_coin(5, change)
(change, p) = get_change_and_coin(1, change)

print 'you get %d dollars, %d quarters, %d dimes, %d nickels, and %d pennies!' % (dollars, q, d, n, p)

Hope this helps!

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Thank you very much! Strange that floating point has these inaccuracies, but this way of writing the program is move clever anyway. –  user2605159 Jul 22 '13 at 3:41

Welcome to IEEE 754 floating point. Enjoy the inaccuracies. Use a fixed-point or integer mechanism if you want to avoid them.

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Please read :Floating Point Arithmetic: Issues and Limitations

http://docs.python.org/2/tutorial/floatingpoint.html

And you might be interested in Decimal Module

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float(40)-float(34.34)=5.659999999999997

I guess you say "change = 1.0" is not 1.0, but 0.99999999999

Try: round(40-34.34, 2)

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