Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Recently, I've been attempting to defeat one of my main weaknesses in programming in general, random generation. I thought it would be an easy thing to do, but the lack of simple information is killing me on it. I don't want to sound dumb, but it feels to me like most of the information from places like this are written for mathematicians who went to college to graduate in theoretical mathematics. I just don't understand what I'm meant to do with that information in order to apply it to programming in a language such as python.

I've been working a few days staring at equations and attempting attempt after attempt, but still after all those days, after ripping my code apart again and again, all that's been working properly this entire time is this noise generator to generate basic noise:

import random
import math

random.seed(0)

def generateWhiteNoise(width,height):
    noise = [[r for r in range(width)] for i in range(height)]

    for i in range(0,height):
        for j in range(0,width):
            noise[i][j] = random.randint(0,1)

    return noise

noise = generateWhiteNoise(50,12)

for i in noise:
    print()
    for o in i:
        if(o == 0):
            print('-',end='')
        else:
            print('#',end='')

This code produces this result:

##-######--#--#-#--##-###-###---#-##-#-----#--##-#
#-#-##-##-#----##------##--#####-#-##---#--#-##---
-------#-#------#---#-#---###--#--#-###-----##-#--
######--#-#-#--####-###---#---###-##--#-#-##--####
-#----###--------##--##--##-#-#--#----###-####--##
---####-#--#--###-#-#--#--#####--####-#-##-##--#--
----#--####-#-#-#-#-#---#--###------###--#-######-
--###--#-###-------#-##--###---#-####----###-#####
#----##--##-#--##-###--#----#-#-##--##-#-##---###-
##---##----##--##--#--#--###-###-#--#-##---#------
-##----#-###---######---#-#---#---###---#---###-##
#--##-##-###-###---#--##-##--##-##-#-#-##--#-#-##-

I'm wanting it to eventually produce something like this:

--------------------------------------------------
------------------####----------------------------
-----------------#####----------------------------
----------------#####-----------------------------
---------------#####--------------###-------------
---------------#####--------------###-------------
---------------------------------####-------------
---######------------------------####-------------
---######------------###--------------------------
----########---------###--------------------------
-----#######---------###--------------------------
------###-----------------------------------------

How can I manage to smooth out the white-noise I generate, and turn it into islands? Can anyone explain it in a very simplistic way for me?

I may be thinking about all of this very wrong.

share|improve this question
1  
I would take user1483482's suggestion. If you want to know more about the inner workings try looking here: devmag.org.za/2009/04/25/perlin-noise I reproduced his code in python, and it works, but it is very slow, even with numpy. –  seth Jul 22 '13 at 6:17
add comment

2 Answers

Just use Noise. Good coders code, great reuse.

Here's a very basic example (others can be found in the /examples directory).

share|improve this answer
    
Here's the issue, I'm looking to actually generate the noise, for if I were to use another language that didn't have said library. –  NAME__ Jul 22 '13 at 6:30
add comment

This article (and others in the same project) is a pretty good introduction to the coding issues. C++ code. https://code.google.com/p/fractalterraingeneration/wiki/Perlin_Noise

Here is a paper on using the Simplex noise algorithm (improves in certain ways on the original Perlin Noise algorithm). It includes example Java code. http://staffwww.itn.liu.se/~stegu/simplexnoise/simplexnoise.pdf

Also the same author made this code public domain recently http://staffwww.itn.liu.se/~stegu/simplexnoise/SimplexNoise.java

It shouldn't be too difficult to translate the concepts into Python, although Python's idioms for data structures are a bit different.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.