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I'm currently writing a Javascript module that basically provides a form to submit.

While writing it, I ran into what seems to be a classic scope problem.

I want the submit() method to make an AJAX call and use an object method to handle the success and fail of the call. Since submit() is an event handler, this is no longer set to the flagBox object. Thus, I no longer have access to flagBox.showSuccess() or flagBox.showFail().

At first, I was looking for a way to set an object-wide self reference, so that I could call something like self.showSuccess().

For now, I'm using jQuery.proxy() to set the context of the handler.

I also thought about implementing a pub/sub pattern or by attaching the method to event.data.

I'm curious what other solutions are out there, and if there are any 'best practices' that I haven't found.

(function( $ ) {

    var FlagBox = function() {};
    FlagBox.prototype = {

        constructor: FlagBox,

        init: function() {
            $('.flag-content-box')
                .on('submit', $.proxy(this.submit, this));
        },

        ...

        showSuccess: function() {
            console.log('success');
        },

        showFail: function() {
            console.log('fail');
        },

        submit: function(event) {
            event.preventDefault();

            var that = this;
                formData = $(event.target).serializeObject();

            $.ajax({
                type:"POST",
                url: '/flag/add.json',
                data: formData,
                success : function(data) {
                    that.showSuccess();
                },
                error : function(jqXHR, textStatus, errorThrown) {
                    showFail();
                }
            });
        }
    };

    var flagBox = new FlagBox();
    flagBox.init();

})(jQuery);

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Using var that = this; is a common (and I think appropriate) pattern. –  go-oleg Jul 22 '13 at 5:02

1 Answer 1

You can bind the success/failure methods to your object like this. This way always the success/failure methods will be called with your object's context.

(function( $ ) {

    var FlagBox = function() {};
    FlagBox.prototype = {

        constructor: FlagBox,

        init: function() {
            $('.flag-content-box')
                .on('submit', $.proxy(this.submit, this));
        },

        ...

        showSuccess: function() {
            console.log('success');
        },

        showFail: function() {
            console.log('fail');
        },

        submit: function(event) {
            event.preventDefault();

            var that = this;
                formData = $(event.target).serializeObject();

            var successFn = (function(obj){
                return function(){
                    return obj.showSuccess.apply(obj, arguments)
                }
            })(this);  

            var failureFn = (function(obj){
                return function(){
                    return obj.showFailure.apply(obj, arguments);
                }
            })(this);  

            $.ajax({
                type:"POST",
                url: '/flag/add.json',
                data: formData,
                success : successFn,
                error : failureFn
            });
        }
    };

    var flagBox = new FlagBox();
    flagBox.init();

})(jQuery);
share|improve this answer
    
It seems simpler to use bind: var successFn = this.showSuccess.bind(this);. –  go-oleg Jul 22 '13 at 4:56
    
The bind function is a recent addition to JS, 5th edition and may not be present in all browsers. –  mohkhan Jul 22 '13 at 4:57
    
Isn't this passed to successFn() the context of the event handler and not the object? Or do you mean to pass that? –  Will M Jul 22 '13 at 5:01
    
Whatever the event handler passes to successFn it will eventually use the object to call the success/Failure methods. –  mohkhan Jul 22 '13 at 5:10

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