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I have this code:

char *name = "George"

if(name == "George")
   printf("It's George")

I thought that c strings could not be compared with == sign and I have to use strcmp. For unknown reason when I compile with gcc (version 4.7.3) this code works. I though that this was wrong because it is like comparing pointers so I searched in google and many people say that it's wrong and comparing with == can't be done. So why this comparing method works ?

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5  
use strcmp(), you are comparing addresses. –  Grijesh Chauhan Jul 22 '13 at 7:15
    
You can check that here stackoverflow.com/questions/13253113/… . –  someone Jul 22 '13 at 7:19
1  
@nouney What's UB? I don't see any reason for it. –  user529758 Jul 22 '13 at 7:19
    
@H2CO3 Yeah there's not reason, my compiler fools me –  nouney Jul 22 '13 at 7:21
2  
For the OP: Look at this code, it will show you why it works. –  nouney Jul 22 '13 at 7:22

5 Answers 5

up vote 24 down vote accepted

I thought that c strings could not be compared with == sign and I have to use strcmp

Right.

I though that this was wrong because it is like comparing pointers so I searched in google and many people say that it's wrong and comparing with == can't be done

That's right too.

So why this comparing method works ?

It doesn't "work". It only appears to be working.

The reason why this happens is probably a compiler optimization: the two string literals are identical, so the compiler really generates only one instance of them, and uses that very same pointer/array whenever the string literal is referenced.

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Just to provide a reference to @H2CO3's answer:

C11 6.4.5 String literals

It is unspecified whether these arrays are distinct provided their elements have the appropriate values. If the program attempts to modify such an array, the behavior is undefined.

This means that in your example, name(a string literal "George") and "George" may and may not share the same location, it's up to the implementation. So don't count on this, it may results differently in other machines.

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3  
This is really helpful, +1. –  user529758 Jul 22 '13 at 7:35
    
+1, GCC will put all string literals in .rodata section and is smart enough to eliminate duplicated. :) –  ludesign Jul 22 '13 at 7:44

The comparison you have done compares the location of the two strings, rather than their content. It just so happens that your compiler decided to only create one string literal containing the characters "George". This means that the location of the string stored in name and the location of the second "George" are the same, so the comparison returns non-zero.

The compiler is not required to do this, however - it could just as easily create two different string literals, with different locations but the same content, and the comparison would then return zero.

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This will fail, since you are comparing two different pointers of two separate strings. If this code still works, then this is a result of a heavy optimization of GCC, that keeps only one copy for size optimization.

Use strcmp(). Link.

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2  
OP just stated that the strings turned out to be equal. He also knows why strcmp() should be used. This is not an answer. It's also wrong, because "you are comparing two different pointers of two separate strings" is not true - for the very reason I explained in my answer. –  user529758 Jul 22 '13 at 7:17
    
Strings are equal, but they are placed in two different memory locations. As a result their pointers are different, and comparison is wrong. If this code still works, then this is a result of a heavy optimization of GCC. –  Andrejs Cainikovs Jul 22 '13 at 7:18
    
"but they are placed in two different memory locations" - no, they aren't, I suggest you finally read my answer. –  user529758 Jul 22 '13 at 7:19
1  
@AndrejsCainikovs, Since they are immutable, they can be placed in one address. –  soon Jul 22 '13 at 7:20
    
Updated my answer. –  Andrejs Cainikovs Jul 22 '13 at 7:23

If you compare two stings that you are comparing base addresses of those strings not actual characters in those strings. for comparing strings use strcmp() and strcasecmp() library functions or write program like this. below is not a full code just logic required for string comparison.

void mystrcmp(const char *source,char *dest)
{
    for(i=0;source[i] != '\0';i++)
        dest[i] = source[i];
   dest[i] = 0;

}
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