Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I search some documentation, and tried Xcode and AppCode. But I'm still uncertain about few things. So can somebody clarify me:

  1. If I have property named foo, should I have private instance variable named _foo or foo?

  2. If I dont't create a private instance variable, just syntetize it. Then what variable should I try to access self->foo or self->_foo ?

I have seen both approaches and both worked so I'm curious if there is any coding rules or conventions for this because I didn't find any.

Note: I'm not interested in @synthetize foo=_foo;

share|improve this question

closed as primarily opinion-based by Eric Brown, rptwsthi, Undo, Maverick, Lipis Mar 4 at 11:08

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Both don't work, on the contrary, declaring the foo ivar and the foo property will make you end up with two confusingly named ivars: _foo and foo. –  Ricardo Sánchez-Sáez Jul 22 '13 at 11:08
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

1. If I have property named foo, should I have private instance variable named _foo or foo?

You don't have to create the instance variable yourself. A instance variable, prefixed with an underscore will automatically be created for you. Since you shouldn't access the variable directly (see below) you shouldn't care about what the underlying variable is called.

2. If I dont't create a private instance variable, just syntetize it. Then what variable should I try to access self->foo or self->_foo ?

Niether. The idea of the property is to use the accessors instead of direct access to the variable. You should use self.foo to get and set the property (or [self foo] and [self setFoo:newFoo]; if you dislike the dot-syntax). Also note that you don't have to explicitly synthesize the property.

share|improve this answer
    
1. Can you provide some link to docs about that? Because I almost certain that both (underscored and not underscored) versions works this same. 2. I'm avare of dot notation, however in some situations I want to access directly to private variable, ignoring accessors. –  The Tosters Jul 22 '13 at 9:17
    
New Features in Xcode 4.4 –  David Rönnqvist Jul 22 '13 at 9:19
1  
2  
    
You are right, I've moved it there. :-) –  Ricardo Sánchez-Sáez Jul 22 '13 at 11:08
add comment

When Xcode auto-synthesizes a property, it automatically adds a supporting instance variable that has the same name as the property with a prepended _. You don't need to manually specify the instance variable, it's automatically there.

Although self->_foo compiles and seems to work, I have never seen anybody using this syntax to access ivars. I find it potentially confusing with the property syntax self.foo, so I would avoid this notation completely. You can access the instance variable by directly typing _foo if you want. But I would also avoid that, unless you are overriding or extending a property accessor method.

I would access the property solely through the property dot notation [1], which IMHO makes code more readable and handles the strong/weak/copy semantics that you specified when declaring the property.

  1. Using property dot notation is syntactic sugar for accessing the property through the auto-syhthesized -(PropertyType)property and -(void)setProperty:(PropertyType)property methods
share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.