Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is using a switch on object types really the main way of calling a common function of stored references to class objects? It doesn't have to be a 'object' value type.

using System;

public class MainClass { public void Main() { print "hello world"; } }
public class SubClassOne : MainClass { }
public class SubClassTwo : MainClass { }

public class Storer
{
     public void Main() {
         object[] objects = new object[2];
         objects[0] = new SubClassOne();
         objects[1] = new SubClassTwo();
         for(i=0;i<2;i++)
         {
             switch(objects[i].GetType().ToString())
             {
                 case: "SubClassOne":
                     SubClassOne subclass = objects[i];
                     subclass.Main();
                     break;
                 case: "SubClassTwo":
                     SubClassTwo subclass = objects[i];
                     subclass.Main(); //Could probably call after the switch
                     break;
             }
         }
     }
}

Note: Code not parsed, so there may be serious errors.

share|improve this question
1  
why not using MainClass[] objects = new MainClass[2] ? –  wudzik Jul 22 '13 at 9:08
    
Would I be able to add subclasses to it, when it really stores MainClass? Never tried. –  Pendrokar Jul 22 '13 at 9:11
    
SubClassTwo is extending MainClass, so you can use it as MainClass without casting. Using objects[0].Main() is valid –  wudzik Jul 22 '13 at 9:14
    
if i am getting the question right, why not to try this - objects[i].Main() Can you explain why u require an switch? –  Jash Jul 22 '13 at 9:15
    
"Using objects[0].Main() is valid" Huh... I remember the builder saying the value type 'object' has no such method, so I added casting. –  Pendrokar Jul 22 '13 at 9:19
show 2 more comments

4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

"Stringly" typed object oriented code is such a bad idea. You (almost) never need to know the type of an object via a string.

Changing your "print" to Console.WriteLine and main to this works fine

    MainClass[] stuff = new MainClass[2];
    stuff[0] = new SubClassOne();
    stuff[1] = new SubClassTwo();
    foreach(var item in stuff)
    {
        item.Main();
    }

If the problem is you are determined to use an array of object, AlexH has answered.

share|improve this answer
add comment

In that case, I suggest to use as keyword to perform a safe cast operation :

using System;

public class MainClass { public void Main() { print "hello world"; } }
public class SubClassOne : MainClass { }
public class SubClassTwo : MainClass { }

public class Storer
{
    public void Main() {
     object[] objects = new object[2];
     objects[0] = new SubClassOne();
     objects[1] = new SubClassTwo();
     for(i=0;i<2;i++)
     {
        var myMainClass = objects[i] as MainClass;
        if (myMainClass != null)
        {
            myMainClass.Main();
        }
     }
 }
}

As wudzik said it should be even better to declare objects as a MainClass array

share|improve this answer
    
You're right, you can perform a direct as Operation and check if the result is null, thanks –  AlexH Jul 22 '13 at 9:22
add comment

There are many ways of solving this in a nice way, depends on:

If you know types and there are not too much of them:

Use LINQ OfType<>(). For more details see MSDN

foreach (var item in objects.OfType<SubClassOne>())
{
   item.Main();
}

foreach (var item in objects.OfType<SubClassTwo>())
{
   item.Main();
}

If there are many types, just introduce common interface

interface ISharedApi
{
    void Main();
}

class SubClassOne : ISharedApi
class SubClassTwo : ISharedApi

And implement this/mark each type by it, then you just need single loop:

var objects = new List<ISharedApi>();
objects.Add(new SubClassOne());
objects.Add(new SubClassTwo());

foreach (var item in objects)
{
   item.Main();
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

You should implement a more object oriented solution. Instead of creating an array consisting of objects you should make MainClass abstract and define an abstract method Main. After that you should implement Main in you sublclasses.

In this way you can exchange your code to:

using System;

public abstract class MainClass { public abstract void Main(); }

public class SubClassOne : MainClass { 
    public override void Main() { print "SubClassOne, hello world"; } 
}
public class SubClassTwo : MainClass { 
    public override void Main() { print "SubClassTwo, hello world"; }
}

public class Storer
{
    public void Main() {
        MainClass[] objects = new MainClass[2];
        objects[0] = new SubClassOne();
        objects[1] = new SubClassTwo();

        foreach(MainClass mc in objects)
        {
            mc.Main();
        }
    }
}  
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.