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Are there any tools that could remove the unwanted variables from the android project.I have tried PMD(which is a good tool),but I want a more generic unused variable remover.

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closed as off-topic by Sergey K., Bill the Lizard Jul 22 '13 at 12:49

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Does your IDE not highlight variables that are created but never used? –  Scott Helme Jul 22 '13 at 10:33
    
@Scott Helme .Yeah it does but some times it becomes crowded with variables from different packages and it becomes difficult to go through each packages,each class and each resources to remove the variables. Especially the String,Dimen etc –  Abx Jul 22 '13 at 10:38
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Questions asking us to recommend or find a tool, library or favorite off-site resource are off-topic for Stack Overflow as they tend to attract opinionated answers and spam. Instead, describe the problem and what has been done so far to solve it. –  Sergey K. Jul 22 '13 at 10:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes there is a helpful tool called AndroidUnusedResources

Check this out here

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Its a nice tool , Let me check it out –  Abx Jul 22 '13 at 10:42

You can probably use Android.Lint

Android Lint is a new tool introduced in ADT 16 (and Tools 16) which scans Android project sources for potential bugs. It is available both as a command line tool, as well as integrated with Eclipse (described below), and IntelliJ. The architecture is deliberately IDE independent so it will hopefully be integrated with other IDEs, with other build tools and with continuous integration systems as well.

Here are some examples of the types of errors that it looks for:

  1. Missing translations (and unused translations)
  2. Layout performance problems (all the issues the old layoutopt tool used to find, and more)
  3. Unused resources
  4. Inconsistent array sizes (when arrays are defined in multiple configurations)
  5. Accessibility and internationalization problems (hardcoded strings, missing contentDescription, etc)
  6. Usability problems (like not specifying an input type on a text field)

refer http://tools.android.com/tips/lint

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