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#include<stdio.h>
int f(int n)
{
    static int a;
    if(n)
        a=n%10+f(n/10);
    return a;
}

int main()
{
    printf("%d",f(12345));
}

The output is 15. My doubt is how the stack memory is being used.

share|improve this question

Let's pretend to be the computer:

  • f(12345)
    • make int a, set to 0 (as static)
    • a = 12345%10 + f(1234)
    • note program counter, so we remember where to come back to
      • f(1234)
      • a = 1234%10 + f(123)
      • note program counter, so we remember where to come back to
        • f(123)
        • a = 123%10 + f(12)
        • note program counter, so we remember where to come back to
          • f(12)
          • a = 12%10 + f(1)
          • note program counter, so we remember where to come back to
            • f(1)
            • a = 1%10 + f(0)
            • note program counter, so we remember where to come back to
              • f(0)
              • return a, i.e. 0 (since we haven't changed it yet)
            • return a = 1%10 + 0 = 1
          • return a = 12%10 + 1 = 3
        • return a = 123%10 + 3 = 6
      • return a = 1234%10 + 6 = 10
    • return a = 12345%10 + 10 = 15
Job done.

share|improve this answer

You'll get the same result with following function implementation:

int f(int n) {
  if (n)
    return n%10 + f(n/10);
  return 0;
}

In your case behavior will be the same, and that's why. Firstly, when you initialize static int variable, it default value is 0 (unlike to just int declaration inside the function body). Secondly, the only value of n when your function just takes a value and does not assign it is 0, because when the line a=n%10 + f(n/10) evaluated, the recursive f() call happens before assignment to a, and its value remains unchanged before f(0) call.

share|improve this answer
    
thank u so much. – Ayesha Gupta Jul 22 '13 at 11:44

On every recursive call to f() I denote n and with additional ' so n = 12345, a = 5 n' = 1234, a' = 4 n'' = 123, a'' = 3 n''' = 12, a''' = 2 n'''' = 1, a'''' = 1 n''''' = 0, a''''' = 0 (because a is static)

the answer is a + a' + a'' + .... = 15

Note: the a doesn't need to be static. int a = 0; will do.

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The detailed stack usage is compiler dependent. But we can say roughly that for each call of function f, the "int n" is pushed onto the stack, thus occupying the size of an int. If you call your function recursively N times, then the stack usage reaches N*sizeof(int) bytes. You also probably need to add some bytes for the return value as well.

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