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I have a type whose destructor has been explicitly deleted; I'd like to make an instance of that type a member of another class.

My expectation is that should be fine provided no attempt is made to delete an instance of the containing class (ie, the containing class's destructor would be invalid).

However, both clang (v3.3) and g++ (v 4.6.3) give an error when an attempt is made to instantiate the constructor of the parent class.

For example:

class DeletedDtor 
{
  public:
    DeletedDtor() {}
    ~DeletedDtor() = delete;
};

class MyClass
{
  public:
    MyClass() = default;
    ~MyClass() = delete;

  private:
    DeletedDtor a;
};

int main() {
    MyClass *p = new MyClass();
}

Under g++, this gives:

test.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
test.cpp:19:30: error: use of deleted function ‘MyClass::MyClass()’
test.cpp:11:5: error: ‘MyClass::MyClass()’ is implicitly deleted because the default definition would be ill-formed:
test.cpp:11:5: error: use of deleted function ‘DeletedDtor::~DeletedDtor()’
test.cpp:5:5: error: declared here

Defining the MyClass constructor myself, rather than letting it take the default implementation, doesn't help either:

class DeletedDtor 
{
  public:
    DeletedDtor() {}
    ~DeletedDtor() = delete;
};

class MyClass
{
  public:
    MyClass();
    ~MyClass() = delete;

  private:
    DeletedDtor a;
};

MyClass::MyClass() : a() {}

int main() {
    MyClass *p = new MyClass();
}

Which gives the compilation error:

test2.cpp: In constructor ‘MyClass::MyClass()’:
test2.cpp:18:24: error: use of deleted function ‘DeletedDtor::~DeletedDtor()’
test2.cpp:5:5: error: declared here
share|improve this question
    
The class names in your code and in your error message do not match. Please clarify. –  Oswald Jul 22 '13 at 11:11
    
apologies, faulty c&p. –  richvdh Jul 22 '13 at 11:13
1  
(You've probably noticed this yourself already) It doesn't help to explicitly delete the destructor of MyClass as well. –  leftaroundabout Jul 22 '13 at 11:19
6  
I wonder if there's a use case for a deleted destructor... –  jrok Jul 22 '13 at 11:23
3  
@jrok it's very useful to ensure memory leaks on type usage –  sehe Jul 22 '13 at 11:33

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Some rationale for this behaviour: There's a situation where the destructor of a member object is automatically invoked outside of the containing object's destructor: in case (something in) the containing object's constructor throws. Before the constructor exits, the destructors of already-constructed members and base class subobjects are invoked in reverse order of construction.

share|improve this answer
    
This makes a lot of sense! Thank you! –  richvdh Jul 22 '13 at 12:19

Your question is not correct, constructor is defined as deleted, since destructor of member of this class is defined as deleted, however, you simply can write

DeletedDtor* d = new DeletedDtor();

and all will works fine (without delete of course), so gcc and clang are both correct.

n3376 12.1/8

A defaulted default constructor for class X is defined as deleted if:

— any direct or virtual base class or non-static data member has a type with a destructor that is deleted or inaccessible from the defaulted default constructor.

share|improve this answer
    
The question is about destructor, not constructor. –  Sergey K. Jul 22 '13 at 11:18
1  
@SergeyK. I see another thing in error. –  ForEveR Jul 22 '13 at 11:19
1  
This answers the question as it's worded, but can you also answer the obvious follow-up: why does basically the same error occur when you try to define a MyClass() constructor yourself? –  leftaroundabout Jul 22 '13 at 11:29
    
@leftaroundabout Situations are different. –  ForEveR Jul 22 '13 at 11:47
    
@ForEveR, thanks, this is a good answer. But, as leftroundabout says, it doesn't fully answer the question of whether I can have a field whose destructor is deleted, since I have (what appears to be, at least) a very similar problem if I define my own constructor for MyClass. –  richvdh Jul 22 '13 at 12:18

I don't have a copy of the actual C++ standard, but the latest working draft says:

8.4.3/2 [dcl.fct.def.delete]

A program that refers to a deleted function implicitly or explicitly, other than to declare it, is ill-formed. [...]

When an object is destructed, the destructors of any member objects are implicitly called, and even though you're not destroying any objects a default destructor, that references the destructor of its members, is still created. Based on that, the error you are getting seems correct to me.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1, that's the answer to the question. –  jrok Jul 22 '13 at 11:59
    
I don't believe this is the problem. Explicitly deleting MyClass's destructor doesn't help me here. I've updated the question to show this. –  richvdh Jul 22 '13 at 12:08

You cannot hold an instance of the class with deleted destructor. But you can hold a pointer to DeletedDtor in your MyClass:

class MyClass
{
  public:
    MyClass() = default;

  private:
    DeletedDtor* a;
};
share|improve this answer
2  
I could, but that doesn't answer the question. –  richvdh Jul 22 '13 at 11:11
1  
I have updated my answer. –  Sergey K. Jul 22 '13 at 11:19

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