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I am revising code and I've seen a lot of methods in which we modify one of the input parameters and then return nothing. I'm wondering if this is the correct way to design these methods. For instance:

void addRespones (List<DTO> dtos, Set<String> codes){
     for (DTO dto: dtos){
          if (responses.contains(dto.getCode()){
               dto.setResponseOk(true);
          } else {
               dto.setResponseOK(false);
          }
     }
}

And then in the method calling addCodes we do some processing depending of the values of the responses.

Is this usage perfectly fine or is there any better common practice? It looks to me like we tend to use input parameters as "output" parameters too often. I thought that being OO, we should use some method of the class DTO, for instance

for (DTO dto: dtos){
     dto.setResponseOk(codes);
}

And then in class DTO:

boolean setResponseOk(Set<String> codes){
     if(codes.contains(this.getCode()){
          return true;
     }
     return false;
}
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closed as primarily opinion-based by Hauke Ingmar Schmidt, Richard Sitze, skuntsel, Cheesebaron, RuiAAPeres Jul 22 '13 at 21:03

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
If you follow the principle of first class collections you would end up with a "DtoCollection" class or similar. That would be a very natural place to put this kind of behaviour. –  MattDavey Jul 22 '13 at 12:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I thought that being OO, we should use some method of the class DTO

Well this depends on your codebase and what you are trying to do.

I am a big fan of Clean Code hence addResponse method would have gotten an axe in a code review.if one is "sure" that we have a finite list of response codes and no other condition ,variable or logic will take part in checking the validity of the response code.

I would have re-factored the class it like this.

void updateResponseCode(List<Dto> dtos,Set<String> responseCodes){
    for (DTO dto: dtos){
        dto.setResponseCodes(codes);
    }

}

And then in the DTO class :

// it always preferable to have a single point of exit for a method
boolean isResponseOk(){
    boolean responseOk=false;
    if(codes.contains(code){
        responseOk=true;
    }
    return responseOk;
}

Otherwise one will opt for a single method:

   void resolveResponseCode(List<Dto> dtos,Set<String> responseCode){
   for (DTO dto: dtos){
       if (responses.contains(dto.getCode()){
           dto.setResponseOk(true);
        } else {
           dto.setResponseOK(false);
        }
    }

}

Note that the only thing that has changed is the method name.

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in the given examples you are passing collections and what ever modifications are done, it will be reflected as pass by reference.

The possible modifications could be return the same collection object after modification- This improves readability. But in this approach only one object can be returned, if you are modifying two input objects inside then this approach goes for a toss and will be forced to use a wrapper class for returning.

In the specific example addRespones() , the for loop can be pulled out of the method and addRespones can be called from the loop. By this you can ensure the collection passed inside will not be changed.

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