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I use this code for reading from socket :

int n ;
char buffer[256];
n = read(newsockfd, buffer, 255);
    if (n < 0)
    {
        error("ERROR reading from socket");
    }

if the data that must be read bigger than 255 byte (for example 1000) which change must be occured ?

I know change char buffer[1000], I need different solution .

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I think the correct code depends on how would you like to process incoming data, how to handle signals, how socket timeouts, and is newsockfd in blocking or nonblocking mode? –  sambowry Nov 22 '09 at 16:02
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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Just read several times from the socket, until you got all the data you want to receive.

For example to receive 1000 bytes, it could look like this (on success read returns the number of bytes read):

int received = 0;
while (received < 1000) {
  n = read(newsockfd, buffer, 255);
  // error checking...
  // do something with the partial data in "buffer"...
  received += n;
}
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in a loop, perhaps? –  bmargulies Nov 22 '09 at 13:50
    
How to use loop what is loop's variable –  SjB Nov 22 '09 at 13:51
    
I added an example. What exactly to do with the data in buffer in each iteration depends on how you want to process further what you are receiving. –  sth Nov 22 '09 at 13:56
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Use something like:

char buffer[256];
memset(buffer, 0, sizeof(buffer));
char* pBuf = buffer;
int bytesLeft = sizeof(buffer) - sizeof(char);

while(bytesLeft > 0)
{
    int n = read(newsockfd, pBuf, bytesLeft);
    if (n < 0)
    {
        error("ERROR reading from socket");
        break;
    }
    if(n == 0)
    {
        error("peer shutted down");
        break;
    }
    pBuf += n;
    bytesLeft -= n;
}
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1  
+1 but...it would be better if there were a 'sizeof' in sight - 255 ==> sizeof(buffer)-1, I assume (consistent with the question). I'm not clear why there's a byte left unused; presumably for a terminal null in a string. Also, the Q asked about 'more than 255 bytes' but the answer doesn't do that. The 'while(true)' condition would be better as 'while (bytesLeft > 0)' and you can avoid the last condition in the loop. Should you worry about 'n == 0' (EOF - other end of socket gone away)? –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 22 '09 at 14:35
    
How will this read more than 255 bytes? This code will read a maximum of 255 bytes; just that that it will read it in chunks. May be I am missing something. Please blast me if I am :) –  Vaibhav Nov 22 '09 at 14:37
    
char pBuf = buffer; should be char *pBuf = buffer; or I don't think it would even compile. –  billyswong Nov 22 '09 at 15:05
    
@Jonathan Leffler You're right on all accounts. I'll correct code. @billyswong yes, that was a typo. thx –  elder_george Nov 22 '09 at 15:41
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Have you checked errno? http://linux.die.net/man/2/read

If you need more data, use a loop, no?

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Does changing the third parameter of read to 1000 work or not? i.e.

char buffer[1001];
read(newsockfd, buffer, 1000);

If the read function does not accept a count that large, you may read it multiple times. In the loop, keep track of how much characters you have read so far and use read(newsockfd, buffer+m, 1000-m);

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Adding to the solutions above, you can even read any number of bytes (assuming you don't have an idea beforehand how many Bytes you are expecting to be sent on the socket) by allocating some more memory to your buffer in which you are reading whenever you reach the maximum limit of the same.

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you mean with a realloc()? –  Suppressingfire Nov 22 '09 at 15:50
    
Yes , can reallocate the same buffer array. –  Vaibhav Nov 23 '09 at 6:55
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