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I have the following code using range-based for-loops (C++11):

vector<atom> protein;
...
for(atom &atom1 : protein) {
    ...
    for(atom &atom2 : protein) {
        if(&atom1 != &atom2) {
                ...
        }
    }
}

Is there a better/cleaner/faster way to write this nested loops? Isn't there a way to include the if condition in the second loop?

share|improve this question
9  
"faster"? The faster is that once you have written this, don't waste your time to rewrite it. It is not that bad. – Nawaz Jul 22 '13 at 12:22
4  
Instead of the deleted diagonal, you could write traditional for loops for the strict upper triangle and put both commuted statements into the body. – Kerrek SB Jul 22 '13 at 12:22
    
you can write a for loop and not a foreach loop and then do 'for(j = i +1...' and save the if condition – No Idea For Name Jul 22 '13 at 12:22

Similar to ronag's answer is a more generic version:

template<typename C, typename Op>
void each_unique_pair(C& container, Op fun)
{
    for(auto it = container.begin(); it != container.end() - 1; ++it)
    {
        for(auto it2 = std::next(it); it2 != container.end(); ++it2)
        {
            fun(*it, *it2);
            fun(*it2, *it);
        }
    }
}

UPDATE

template<typename C, typename O1, typename O2>
void each_value_and_pair(C& container, O1 val_fun, O2 pair_fun)
{
    auto it = std::begin(container);
    auto end = std::end(container);
    if(it == end)
        return;

    for(; it != std::prev(end); ++it)
    {
        val_fun(*it);
        for(auto it2 = std::next(it); it2 != end; ++it2)
        {
            pair_fun(*it2, *it);
            pair_fun(*it, *it2);
        }
    }
}

Which is used like this:

main()
{
    std::vector<char> values;
    // populate values
    // ....
    each_value_and_pair(values, 
        [](char c1) { std::cout << "value: " << c1 << std::endl;}, 
        [](char c1, char c2){std::cout << "pair: " << c1 << "-" << c2 << std::endl;});
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's not the same. I only don't want the diagonal, not only the upper triangle! – Kyle_the_hacker Jul 22 '13 at 12:52
    
Now it's the same. – Peter R Jul 22 '13 at 12:53
    
For maximum genericity, it should be std::prev(std::end(container)) rather than container.end()-1; and you'll also need to handle an empty container correctly. – Mike Seymour Jul 22 '13 at 12:54
    
@PeterR : No, it stil isn't the same, as I said to MikeSeymour, there is code specific to atom1 between the for-loops. – Kyle_the_hacker Jul 22 '13 at 13:03
    
@Kyle_the_hacker Ah, I missed that nuance when I first read your post. I'm not sure a generic version is useful for this case. I've posted one underneath the original code just for kicks. – Peter R Jul 22 '13 at 13:14

Sad but true. How about normal loops with iterators and auto keyword?

share|improve this answer
    
How does that help? – R. Martinho Fernandes Jul 22 '13 at 12:27
    
for (auto a = std::begin(arr); a != std::end(arr); ++a) \\ next line for (auto b = a + 1; b != std::end(arr); ++b) – herolover Jul 22 '13 at 12:28
3  
That's... the same, but with more code. – R. Martinho Fernandes Jul 22 '13 at 12:29
    
That's not the same. The if condition in the second loop. – herolover Jul 22 '13 at 12:31
    
Now that you edited that (why don't you include it in answer instead of a comment?), it has only about half as many iterations as the original code, so it doesn't have the same behaviour as the original. – R. Martinho Fernandes Jul 22 '13 at 12:42

I think this might be what you are looking for:

for(auto it1 = std::begin(protein1); it1 != std::end(protein); ++it1)
{
    for(auto it2 = std::next(it1); it2 != std::end(protein); ++it2)
    {
          auto& atom1 = *it1;
          auto& atom2 = *it2;

           // ...
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
More like it2 = std::next(it1). – Kerrek SB Jul 22 '13 at 12:29
    
@KerrekSB: Indeed. – ronag Jul 22 '13 at 12:30
1  
That's not the same. It has only about half the number of iterations. – R. Martinho Fernandes Jul 22 '13 at 12:32
    
But I only don't want the diagonal, not only the upper triangle. – Kyle_the_hacker Jul 22 '13 at 12:33
4  
@R.MartinhoFernandes: Indeed; what this (and the other similar answer) are missing is that you need the loop body to be do_stuff_with(atom1,atom2); do_stuff_with(atom2,atom1); to get the original behaviour. – Mike Seymour Jul 22 '13 at 12:34

you're method is just fine. if you want to save the if statement you can

vector<atom> protein;
int i, j;
...
for(i = 0; i < protein.size() : i++) {
    atom &atom1 = protein.at(i);
    for(j = i+1; j < protein.size() ; j++) {
        atom &atom2 = protein.at(j);
                    // Do something
                    // Swap the atom2 and atom1
                    // Do something again
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
That's not the same. It has only about half the number of iterations. – R. Martinho Fernandes Jul 22 '13 at 12:31
1  
But I only don't want the diagonal, not only the upper triangle. – Kyle_the_hacker Jul 22 '13 at 12:34
    
@Kyle_the_hacker i've edited the 'for' statement for you – No Idea For Name Jul 22 '13 at 12:39
1  
@LiranElisha now it only loops through the lower triangle :S – R. Martinho Fernandes Jul 22 '13 at 12:41
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes you're right. that's my fault for doing fast edit. simply do twice whatever you want to do, unless it's to change the items in a specific order, and then i'm out of ideas – No Idea For Name Jul 22 '13 at 12:47

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