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Can any one tell me why the following program crashes.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>
int main()
{
    char **str;
    strcpy(*str, "One");
    puts(*str);
}

And why the following program doesn't.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>
int main()
{
    char **str;
    *str = "One";
    puts(*str);
}
share|improve this question
up vote 7 down vote accepted

strcopy assumes you have memory available.

In the second one you are pointing *str at the statically allocated "One" char[] literal which decays to a pointer. This is actually undefined as well, since str isn't init'd you're still copying a pointer to gibberish.

In the first one you're trying to copy a string to wherever *str points to when left uninitialized. This will almost certainly crash your program since it's just pointing to some garbage address.

So to do this correctly

//allocate space for ARRAY_SIZE pointers
char **str = malloc(sizeof(char*) * ARRAY_SIZE); 
*str = "One"; // assign the address of "One"
puts(*str); // print it.
...
free(str);
share|improve this answer
    
@DrewMcGowen the "One" literal one? There's no modification there, if he had tried to do char* foo = "meh"; foo[2] = 'r' than I'd expect it to crash – jozefg Jul 22 '13 at 13:14
    
Bah, that's what I get for trying to reply on a Monday morning :P – Drew McGowen Jul 22 '13 at 13:15
    
I think the second one works just due to luck. He sets up a pointer-to-pointer to char, and never allocates memory for it. Dereferencing it with *str = "One"; and trying to store the address of "One" into unallocated memory leads to undefined behavior, undefined behavior leads to suffering, and suffering leads to the Dark Side. – Paul Griffiths Jul 22 '13 at 13:27
    
@PaulGriffiths Ah, you're right aren't you. Edited – jozefg Jul 22 '13 at 13:29

The first one:

str decleared as char**, But you did not use memorey allocation for that!

Remmber, str is pointer to pointer, so if you want to keep an adress in str*, you should use memorey allocation or initialize in the declaration row!!

In your code, str* is just an adress, not a string!

The second one is about the same idea.

share|improve this answer

Your second one doesn't crash due to sheer luck. It ought to be like this:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
int main()
{
    char **str = malloc(sizeof *str);
    if ( str != NULL ) {
        *str = "One";
        puts(*str);
        free(str);
    }

    return 0;
}

or:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>
int main()
{
    char * str;
    str = "One";
    puts(str);

    return 0;
}

As you wrote it, you're trying to stuff the address of the string literal "One" into unallocated memory, which gives you undefined behavior.

Your first one crashes for the same reason, you're trying to copy the bytes 'O', 'n', 'e', and '\0' into unallocated memory.

share|improve this answer
2  
The second not crashing isn't sheer good luck, it's sheer bad luck. – This isn't my real name Jul 22 '13 at 16:52

In the first program, you are doing a string copy to a non memory allocated pointer. (*str) has no malloc, new, etc..

In the second one, you are pointing the string pointer to a stack variable. the str pointer will only be valid during the context of the call and when the function exits the str pointer will point to an invalid space. Since this is main(), you don't see that

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1  
The second one is also wrong. The questioner is dereferencing str, which is uninitialized. The not crashing is simply coincidence. – This isn't my real name Jul 22 '13 at 16:54

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