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I'm building a basic encryptor that is outputting into an array and not a string. I'm guessing I need to use the .join method but for the life of me can't find out where, without getting an error.

class Encryptor
  def cipher
    {'a' => 'n', 'b' => 'o', 'c' => 'p', 'd' => 'q',
     'e' => 'r', 'f' => 's', 'g' => 't', 'h' => 'u',
     'i' => 'v', 'j' => 'w', 'k' => 'x', 'l' => 'y',
     'm' => 'z', 'n' => 'a', 'o' => 'b', 'p' => 'c',
     'q' => 'd', 'r' => 'e', 's' => 'f', 't' => 'g',
     'u' => 'h', 'v' => 'i', 'w' => 'j', 'x' => 'k',
     'y' => 'l', 'z' => 'm'}
   end

   def encrypt_letter(letter)
     lowercase_letter = letter.downcase
   end

   def encrypt(string)
     letters = string.split("")

     letters.collect do |letter|
       encrypted_letter = encrypt_letter(letter)
     end
   end

end
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closed as unclear what you're asking by toro2k, sawa, Sofffia, Wayne Conrad, totymedli Mar 3 at 2:31

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
What is done in your encrypt_letter method? It doesn't seem to be defined anywhere. –  Charles Caldwell Jul 22 '13 at 13:42
    
Sorry that was one of my attempts to get it to work that had been left in when I copied the code over. –  Jadam Jul 22 '13 at 14:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could tighten up your encrypt_letter method by remembering that the last value evaluated in the method is also the return value.

def encrypt_letter(letter)
  cipher[letter.downcase]
end

Encryptor.new.encrypt_letter('h') #=> "u"

Also, the collect method will actually return an array of all the values returned by the block (the last value evaluated by the block) so there's no need to assign it to a variable within the block. Since you have the array from collect (which is just all the encrypted letters, call join on that (and since that is the final evaluation in the method, it is the return value).

def encrypt(string)
  letters = string.split("")

  letters.collect {|letter| encrypt_letter(letter) }.join
end

Encryptor.new.encrypt("Hello") #=> "uryyb"

Technically, you could even just remove the letters variable and do it all in one line but I personally think it is a little more readable this way.

IMHO:

You could probably make all of the methods class methods since you aren't storing any instance variables and there doesn't seem to be any reason to keep it around outside of just encrypting a string.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for taking the time to explain this for me. I apologize if it was a dumb question. –  Jadam Jul 22 '13 at 14:12
    
It only seems like a dumb question once you see the solution. Up until that point, it seems very momentous. =) I think the downvotes you got were due to it being a little too localized and how a slightly better understanding of Array methods would have pointed you in the direction to your solution. Understanding the methods available to Array and Enumerable will greatly help you. (I keep their documentation up in a browser tab almost constantly.) =) –  Charles Caldwell Jul 22 '13 at 14:19
class Encryptor
   def cipher
     {'a' => 'n', 'b' => 'o', 'c' => 'p', 'd' => 'q',
      'e' => 'r', 'f' => 's', 'g' => 't', 'h' => 'u',
      'i' => 'v', 'j' => 'w', 'k' => 'x', 'l' => 'y',
      'm' => 'z', 'n' => 'a', 'o' => 'b', 'p' => 'c',
      'q' => 'd', 'r' => 'e', 's' => 'f', 't' => 'g',
      'u' => 'h', 'v' => 'i', 'w' => 'j', 'x' => 'k',
      'y' => 'l', 'z' => 'm'}
   end

   def encrypt_letter(letter)
     lowercase_letter = cipher[letter.downcase] #each letter passed is crypted here
   end

  def encrypt(string)
    letters = string.split("")

    encrypted_letter = []  #define an array to store each encrypted char

    letters.collect do |letter|          
      encrypted_letter << encrypt_letter(letter) #accumulate encrypted chars in the array
    end
    encrypted_letter.join #now time to use join to form a string and return it
  end
end

Encryptor.new.encrypt("something") #=> "fbzrguvat"
share|improve this answer
1  
Explain to the OP what you did and why it works. Don't hand out fish, explain how to fish. –  the Tin Man Jul 22 '13 at 13:50
1  
@theTinMan Normally that is a good advice, but for these kinds of question, I think this kind of answer is enough. It deserves it. –  sawa Jul 22 '13 at 13:52
1  
"It deserves it"? Deserves what? Other people, beyond the OP look at these. –  the Tin Man Jul 22 '13 at 13:53
1  
@theTinMan This kind of question deserves answers with this much explanation. You are right that other people look at this. This kind of questions are not helpful to others, and should be better closed. An answer does not need to go beyond what was asked and explain what the question should have done. –  sawa Jul 22 '13 at 13:57
    
I apologize for asking a stupid question that gets down rated I guess. Just trying to learn. –  Jadam Jul 22 '13 at 14:10

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