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I'm a beginner of c++. I want know why the exception is thrown at this line:

operator double() const
{
    return this->denominator/this->numerator;
}

I found numerator == 0,but I have given default values in the ctor. Why? Please help me.

class Rational {
public:
    int numerator;
    int denominator;

    Rational(int numerator = 2, int denominator = 1)
    {
        numerator = 2;
        denominator = 1;
    };

    operator double() const
    {
        return this->denominator/this->numerator;
    };

};

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    Rational r(1, 2);
    cout << r;
    //   double d = 0.5*r;
    return 0;
}
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1  
Please post a complete code and format your code properly. Furthermore, I don’t understand your question. –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 22 '13 at 14:06
    
Do you divide int by an int and expect double? Try again, think harder. –  cdshines Jul 22 '13 at 14:06
4  
You assign values to the constructor arguments, leaving the member variables uninitialized. If your members have the same identifier, you must prepend this-> when assigning. –  Frank Osterfeld Jul 22 '13 at 14:08
    
It would be even better to do this in a ctor initializer list. –  arne Jul 22 '13 at 14:11
    
Adding to what Frank said, It's better to use an initialization list. You won't need to prefix this-> if you do. –  StoryTeller Jul 22 '13 at 14:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First, this line is very wrong:

Rational(int numerator = 2, int denominator = 1){ numerator = 2; denominator = 1;};

The arguments numerator and denominator are in the stack frame of your ctor thus hiding your class's members Rational::numerator and Rational::denominator and secondly, you are completely ignoring what the caller actually sends as its arguments (not because you specify the default values, but because you explicitly set numerator=2; denominator=1. This line should actually be:

Rational(int numerator = 2, int denominator = 1){ this->numerator = numerator; this->denominator = denominator;};

OR you could use an initializer list (and overloaded constructors):

Rational() : numerator(2), denominator(1) {};
Rational(int numerator, int denominator) : numerator(numerator), denominator(denominator) {};

Now, the second problem is that int/int => int :: dividing an integer by another integer yields integer division, you need to cast one of your int's to double so that both int's are upconverted to double before calculating the division, like so:

operator double() const{ return ((double)this->denominator)/this->numerator;};
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oh, I have know, but Still want to thank you。 –  Best Water Jul 22 '13 at 14:18
    Rational(int numerator = 2, int denominator = 1)
{
    numerator = 2;
    denominator = 1;
};

I would change this to

    Rational(int numerator, int denominator)
{
    this->numerator = numerator;
    this->denominator = denominator;
};

I don't know exactly if this is causing your problem, but I think it's contributing to it. Your call to Rational(int,int) will still work fine and add your specified values into the Object you're creating.

The issue with your code, is scope. I believe you were just re-assigning the arguments/parameters instead of actually re-assigning your instance variables, which I'm assuming was your goal.

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2  
The actual exception is probably divide by zero caused by failed class initialisation, which you have corrected. –  trojanfoe Jul 22 '13 at 14:15
    
@trojanfoe exactly - since he was never re-assigning the instance variables, I'm assuming they were somehow set to 0 (even though I thought C++ just gave them "garbage" values at first?) thus causing the divide by zero error. They weren't ever getting re-assigned because he was just changing the arguments' values instead of the instance variables. At least these are my thoughts –  Ricky Mutschlechner Jul 22 '13 at 14:17

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