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Apologies in advance for bringing a non-programming question to SO, but the powers-that-be have determined that all MATLAB-related questions belong here.

I've been doing some Kalman Filters and plotting state variable estimates to see how they converge over time. Now, I'd like to visually represent the covariance matrix, which is an indication of the uncertainty in the estimate. So I wrote a little function that colors a band around the estimate.

(Edit note: A prior version made the mistake of using 2*cov for the width of each halfband, when it needs to be 2 standard deviations)

function [ls, regions] = plotuncertain( t, y, cov )
    t = t(:);
    y = y(:);
    stdev = cov(:).^(1/2);
    a = ones(size(t));
    regions(1) = patch('XData', [t; t(end:-1:1)], ...
                       'YData', [y + 2*stdev; y(end:-1:1)], ...
                       'FaceVertexAlphaData', [0*a; a], ...
                       'FaceAlpha', 'interp', 'EdgeColor', 'none');
    regions(2) = patch('XData', [t; t(end:-1:1)], ...
                       'YData', [y - 2*stdev; y(end:-1:1)], ...
                       'FaceVertexAlphaData', [0*a; a], ...
                       'FaceAlpha', 'interp', 'EdgeColor', 'none');
    ls = line('XData', t, 'YData', y);

And it looks reasonable:

One cone of uncertainty

But I have two state variables with similar meaning that I'd like to plot concurrently on a single axis.

Two cones of uncertainty

Uh-oh, the initial data for k_1 is obscured by the (top half of the) k_2 band. MATLAB didn't draw the lines and patches in the order I submitted them. And even if I manage to control the order they draw, alpha-blending is still less optimal than mixing the colors based on the probabilities.

Any ideas how to render both at the same time? Can I somehow take advantage of the fact that I'm using two distinct color planes for the two variables?

share|improve this question
    
Check if getting the handles of the lines and raising them using uistackworks (raise the second line). – Werner Jul 22 '13 at 15:57
up vote 3 down vote accepted

When plots are too complex, matlab starts to behave erratically just like here. I often try to apply a solution described here.

For your particular (and very nice) plot, I would modify the function by declaring an axes:

function [ax, ls, regions] = plotuncertain( t, y, cov )

    ax = axes;

    t = t(:);
    y = y(:);
    cov = cov(:);
    a = ones(size(t));
    regions(1) = patch('XData', [t; t(end:-1:1)], ...
                       'YData', [y + 2*cov; y(end:-1:1)], ...
                       'FaceVertexAlphaData', [0*a; a], ...
                       'FaceAlpha', 'interp', 'EdgeColor', 'none');
    regions(2) = patch('XData', [t; t(end:-1:1)], ...
                       'YData', [y - 2*cov; y(end:-1:1)], ...
                       'FaceVertexAlphaData', [0*a; a], ...
                       'FaceAlpha', 'interp', 'EdgeColor', 'none');
    ls = line('XData', t, 'YData', y);

and then call the function with:

[ax1, ls, regions] = plotuncertain( t, y, cov );
[ax2, ls, regions] = plotuncertain( t, y, cov );
set(ax2,'Visible','off');
linkaxes([ax1 ax2],'xy'); %or any (XLim,YLim) settings

This way, transparency in one axes is independent of the other.

EDIT

A way to better control the color blending is to convert each of the axes created in a dedicated figure into an image and then fuse them. One can use for example imfuse(im1,im2,'blend') (image processing toolbox) or whatever function that mixes 2 images.

The way to extract an image from a figure is

F = getframe(gcf);
imwrite(F.cdata, 'image.png');

enter image description here

For sure, this solution is only suitable at the final step of a reporting process (I would definitively not use it for a scientific article - see the comments - but for spectacular presentations). It may also be more efficient to use an alternative software that better deals with transparency/OpenGL than Matlab does.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried this and while it looks nice and definitely controls the draw order, definitely one patch is on top and obscuring the other. (Also the legend broke). It would be ideal if there was symmetry in the blend. – Ben Voigt Jul 22 '13 at 21:44
    
Please see the edit for the workaround using images. Il leaves the legend problem open (probably crop the legend images and insert them in the final one). Starts to feel like this is not a good solution though! – marsei Jul 22 '13 at 23:22
    
Thanks, I wasn't aware of getframe. I'll have to check that out and see whether it gives me good control of papersize. – Ben Voigt Jul 22 '13 at 23:26
    
I finally have a "production-type version" of a figure using vector images (with full control of image proportion). Unfortunately, I am not sure that this type of blending is allowed in scientific journals. Nature states that "Colour, when used as an identifying tool, should be distinct". The image have blue and red (as indicated in the legend), but not purple. Also, the blue and red patch in the legend do not refer to transparency. For my own use, this blending is reserved for the show in oral presentations. @Ben Voigt-in which context would you use it? – marsei Jul 23 '13 at 11:19
1  
That's beautiful. Both bands are easily seen. – Ben Voigt Jul 23 '13 at 16:05

Although you suggest having attempted this, I found swapping the order of the patches made a large difference.

My version of your example, first without swapping:

t=[1:100];
y=t.^2;
cov=t.^2;

t2=[1:100];
y2=t2.^2.05;
cov2=t2.^2;

figure

t = t(:);
y = y(:);
cov = cov(:);
a = ones(size(t));

t2 = t2(:);
y2 = y2(:);
cov2 = cov2(:);

a = ones(size(t2));

regions(1) = patch('XData', [t; t(end:-1:1)], ...
    'YData', [y + 2*cov; y(end:-1:1)], ...
    'FaceVertexAlphaData', [0*a; a], ...
    'FaceAlpha', 'interp', 'EdgeColor', 'none', 'FaceColor', 'r');

regions(2) = patch('XData', [t; t(end:-1:1)], ...
    'YData', [y - 2*cov; y(end:-1:1)], ...
    'FaceVertexAlphaData', [0*a; a], ...
    'FaceAlpha', 'interp', 'EdgeColor', 'none', 'FaceColor', 'r');
ls = line('XData', t, 'YData', y,'Linewidth',1.5);

regions(3) = patch('XData', [t2; t2(end:-1:1)], ...
    'YData', [y2 - 2*cov2; y2(end:-1:1)], ...
    'FaceVertexAlphaData', [0*a; a], ...
    'FaceAlpha', 'interp', 'EdgeColor', 'none', 'FaceColor', 'b');
ls = line('XData', t2, 'YData', y2,'Linewidth',1.5);

regions(4) = patch('XData', [t2; t2(end:-1:1)], ...
    'YData', [y2 + 2*cov2; y2(end:-1:1)], ...
    'FaceVertexAlphaData', [0*a; a], ...
    'FaceAlpha', 'interp', 'EdgeColor', 'none', 'FaceColor', 'b');

not swapped

then with swapping:

regions(1) = patch('XData', [t; t(end:-1:1)], ...
    'YData', [y + 2*cov; y(end:-1:1)], ...
    'FaceVertexAlphaData', [0*a; a], ...
    'FaceAlpha', 'interp', 'EdgeColor', 'none', 'FaceColor', 'r');

regions(3) = patch('XData', [t2; t2(end:-1:1)], ...
    'YData', [y2 - 2*cov2; y2(end:-1:1)], ...
    'FaceVertexAlphaData', [0*a; a], ...
    'FaceAlpha', 'interp', 'EdgeColor', 'none', 'FaceColor', 'b');
ls = line('XData', t2, 'YData', y2,'Linewidth',1.5);


regions(2) = patch('XData', [t; t(end:-1:1)], ...
    'YData', [y - 2*cov; y(end:-1:1)], ...
    'FaceVertexAlphaData', [0*a; a], ...
    'FaceAlpha', 'interp', 'EdgeColor', 'none', 'FaceColor', 'r');
ls = line('XData', t, 'YData', y,'Linewidth',1.5);


regions(4) = patch('XData', [t2; t2(end:-1:1)], ...
    'YData', [y2 + 2*cov2; y2(end:-1:1)], ...
    'FaceVertexAlphaData', [0*a; a], ...
    'FaceAlpha', 'interp', 'EdgeColor', 'none', 'FaceColor', 'b');

swapped

Great effect, I hadn't seen this before in Matlab.

share|improve this answer
    
Plotting the second order (1,3,2,4) gives me figure 1 and (1,2,3,4) figure 2. And I don't have the thick 'ls' lines. – marsei Jul 22 '13 at 20:57
    
@Magla That's strange, I checked again and came up with the result shown. Could be the version of Matlab, I still use ancient R14. In any case this is probably not an ideal solution since one patch tends to overwhelm the other. – Try Hard Jul 22 '13 at 21:05
1  
Your last comment is exactly right. I didn't say varying the call order made no difference, just that MATLAB didn't layer things in the same order as the calls. I'm using R2012a. But the "one patch overwhelms the other" is my primary concern. I'd ideally like one in each color channel so that there's symmetry and it doesn't matter which is drawn first (and then the lines go on top). – Ben Voigt Jul 22 '13 at 21:43

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