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I don't understand why if I write

(define (iter-list lst)
  (let ((cur lst))
    (lambda ()
      (if (null? cur)
          '<<end>>
          (let ((v (car cur)))
            (set! cur (cdr cur))
            v)))))

(define il2 (iter-list '(1 2)))

and call (il2) 2 times I have printed: 1 then 2 (that's the result I want to have) But if I don't put (lambda () and apply (il2) 2times I obtain then 1 In other words why associating the if part to a function lambda() makes it keep the memory of what we did when we applied the function before?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is what's happening. First, it's important that you understand that when you write this:

(define (iter-list lst)
  (let ((cur lst))
    (lambda ()
      ...)))

It gets transformed to this equivalent form:

(define iter-list
  (lambda (lst)
    (let ((cur lst))
      (lambda ()
        ...))))

So you see, another lambda was there in the first place. Now, the outermost lambda will define a local variable, cur which will "remember" the value of the list and then will return the innermost lambda as a result, and the innermost lambda "captures", "encloses" the cur variable defined above inside a closure. In other words: iter-list is a function that returns a function as a result, but before doing so it will "remember" the cur value. That's why you call it like this:

(define il2 (iter-list '(1 2))) ; iter-list returns a function
(il2)                           ; here we're calling the returned function

Compare it with what happens here:

(define (iter-list lst)
  (let ((cur lst))
    ...))

The above is equivalent to this:

(define iter-list
  (lambda (lst)
    (let ((cur lst))
      ...)))

In the above, iter-list is just a function, that will return a value when called (not another function, like before!), this function doesn't "remember" anything and returns at once after being called. To summarize: the first example creates a closure and remembers values because it's returning a function, whereas the second example just returns a number, and gets called like this:

(define il2 (iter-list '(1 2))) ; iter-list returns a number
(il2)                           ; this won't work: il2 is just a number!
il2                             ; this works, and returns 1
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When you wrap the if in a lambda (and return it like that), the cur let (which is in scope for the if) is attached to the lambda. This is called a closure.

Now, if you read a little bit about closures, you'll see that they can be used to hold onto state (just like you do here). This can be very useful for creating ever incrementing counters, or object systems (a closure can be used as a kind of inside out object).

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Note that in your original code, you renamed lst as cur. You didn't actually need to do that. The inner lambda (the closure to be) could have directly captured the lst argument. Thus, this would produce the same result:

(define (iter-list lst)
  (lambda ()
     ...))   ; your code, replace 'cur' with 'lst'

Here are some example of other closure-producing functions that capture a variable:

(define (always n)
  (lambda () n))

(define (n-adder n)
  (lambda (m) (+ n m)))

(define (count-from n)
  (lambda ()
    (let ((result n))
      (set! n (+ n 1))
      result)))
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