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The following example fills the ItemsControl with a List of BackupDirectories which I get from code.

How can I change this so that I get the same information from the app.config file?

XAML:

<Window x:Class="TestReadMultipler2343.Window1"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    Title="Window1" Height="300" Width="300">
    <Grid Margin="10">
        <Grid.RowDefinitions>
            <RowDefinition Height="30"/>
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto"/>
        </Grid.RowDefinitions>
        <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
            <ColumnDefinition Width="120"/>
            <ColumnDefinition Width="160"/>
        </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
        <TextBlock 
            Grid.Row="0"
            Grid.Column="0"
            Text="Title:"/>
        <TextBlock 
            Grid.Row="0"
            Grid.Column="1" 
            Text="{Binding Title}"/>
        <TextBlock 
            Grid.Row="1"
            Grid.Column="0"
            Text="Backup Directories:"/>
        <ItemsControl 
            Grid.Row="1"
            Grid.Column="1"
            ItemsSource="{Binding BackupDirectories}"/>
    </Grid>
</Window>

code-behind:

using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Windows;
using System.Configuration;
using System.ComponentModel;

namespace TestReadMultipler2343
{
    public partial class Window1 : Window, INotifyPropertyChanged
    {

        #region ViewModelProperty: Title
        private string _title;
        public string Title
        {
            get
            {
                return _title;
            }

            set
            {
                _title = value;
                OnPropertyChanged("Title");
            }
        }
        #endregion

        #region ViewModelProperty: BackupDirectories
        private List<string> _backupDirectories = new List<string>();
        public List<string> BackupDirectories
        {
            get
            {
                return _backupDirectories;
            }

            set
            {
                _backupDirectories = value;
                OnPropertyChanged("BackupDirectories");
            }
        }
        #endregion

        public Window1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
            DataContext = this;

            Title = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings.Get("title");

            GetBackupDirectoriesInternal();
        }

        void GetBackupDirectoriesInternal()
        {
            BackupDirectories.Add(@"C:\test1");
            BackupDirectories.Add(@"C:\test2");
            BackupDirectories.Add(@"C:\test3");
            BackupDirectories.Add(@"C:\test4");
        }

        void GetBackupDirectoriesFromConfig()
        {
            //BackupDirectories = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings.GetValues("backupDirectories");
        }


        #region INotifiedProperty Block
        public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

        protected void OnPropertyChanged(string propertyName)
        {
            PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = PropertyChanged;

            if (handler != null)
            {
                handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
            }
        }
        #endregion

    }
}

app.config:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<configuration>
  <appSettings>
    <add key="title" value="Backup Tool" />
    <!--<add key="backupDirectories">
      <add value="C:\test1"/>
      <add value="C:\test2"/>
      <add value="C:\test3"/>
      <add value="C:\test4"/>
    </add>-->
  </appSettings>
</configuration>
share|improve this question
    
simplest solution is to use System.Collections.Specialized.StringCollection: Answered for question: Store String Array In appSettings? –  Serkan Apr 23 '13 at 9:38

4 Answers 4

up vote 54 down vote accepted

You can create your own custom config section in the app.config file. There are quite a few tutorials around to get you started. Ultimately, you could have something like this:

<configSections>
    <section name="backupDirectories" type="TestReadMultipler2343.BackupDirectoriesSection, TestReadMultipler2343" />
  </configSections>

<backupDirectories>
   <directory location="C:\test1" />
   <directory location="C:\test2" />
   <directory location="C:\test3" />
</backupDirectories>
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent Links to tutorials. Wish I could upvote you more than once. –  Moose Feb 5 '11 at 15:34
    
Am I missing something, or do none of the three tutorials actually show you how to have a list of elements? –  Chuu Dec 8 at 23:30

You could have them semi-colon delimited in a single value, e.g.

App.config

<add key="paths" value="C:\test1;C:\test2;C:\test3" />

C#

var paths = new List<string>(ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["paths"].Split(new char[] { ';' }));
share|improve this answer
7  
That is such a quick way of doing it if you don't need the overhead of a custom config section. This is good enough IMO. –  Peter Kelly Jul 8 '10 at 15:08
1  
that was my thinking... custom config sections are very nice and very powerful, but perhaps overkill for a simple string array. –  Adam Ralph Jul 10 '10 at 6:46
    
This is the way I'd done it for a long time... today I am converting to a config section because managing my list (it is a list of pluging classes to load, which can change depending on the environment) has gotten messy with 30+ strings in it. –  Moose Feb 5 '11 at 14:33
1  
This solution is really good idea. Just not so good when I want to edit config - erase some of paths. Adding is not a problem. –  Ms. Nobody Jun 13 '13 at 12:06
1  
Ugh. Great solution, but just need to mention you have to add System.Configuration as a reference (can't just use the "using") in order to get access to ConfigurationManager. –  Jim Jun 18 at 15:20

There's actually a very little known class in the BCL for this purpose exactly: CommaDelimitedStringCollectionConverter. It serves as a middle ground of sorts between having a ConfigurationElementCollection (as in Richard's answer) and parsing the string yourself (as in Adam's answer).

For example, you could write the following configuration section:

public class MySection : ConfigurationSection
{
    [ConfigurationProperty("MyStrings")]
    [TypeConverter(typeof(CommaDelimitedStringCollectionConverter))]
    public CommaDelimitedStringCollection MyStrings
    {
        get { return (CommaDelimitedStringCollection)base["MyStrings"]; }
    }
}

You could then have an app.config that looks like this:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<configuration>
  <configSections>
    <section name="foo" type="ConsoleApplication1.MySection, ConsoleApplication1"/>
  </configSections>
  <foo MyStrings="a,b,c,hello,world"/>
</configuration>

Finally, your code would look like this:

var section = (MySection)ConfigurationManager.GetSection("foo");
foreach (var s in section.MyStrings)
    Console.WriteLine(s); //for example
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure why you would go through creating a custom section, but then have it limited to a delimited string; however it is something I hadn't seen or known of. It is interesting idea and well documented, thanks for providing! –  mklinker Aug 3 '12 at 16:44

Had the same problem, but solved it in a different way. It might not be the best solution, but its a solution.

in app.config:

<add key="errorMailFirst" value="test@test.no"/>
<add key="errorMailSeond" value="krister@tets.no"/>

Then in my configuration wrapper class, I add a method to search keys.

        public List<string> SearchKeys(string searchTerm)
        {
            var keys = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings.Keys;
            return keys.Cast<object>()
                       .Where(key => key.ToString().ToLower()
                       .Contains(searchTerm.ToLower()))
                       .Select(key => ConfigurationManager.AppSettings.Get(key.ToString())).ToList();
        }

For anyone reading this, i agree that creating your own custom configuration section is cleaner, and more secure, but for small projects, where you need something quick, this might solve it.

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