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Let's say I have a sequence.

IEnumerable<int> sequence = GetSequenceFromExpensiveSource();
// sequence now contains: 0,1,2,3,...,999999,1000000

Getting the sequence is not cheap and is dynamically generated, and I want to iterate through it once only.

I want to get 0 - 999999 (i.e. everything but the last element)

I recognize that I could do something like:

sequence.Take(sequence.Count() - 1);

but that results in two enumerations over the big sequence.

Is there a LINQ construct that lets me do:

sequence.TakeAllButTheLastElement();
share|improve this question
    
You've to choose between an O(2n) time or O(count) space efficiency algorithm, where the latter also needs to move items in an internal array. –  Dykam Nov 22 '09 at 16:18
1  
Dario, would you please explain for someone who's not that into big o-notation? –  alexn Nov 22 '09 at 16:56
    
See also this duplicate question: stackoverflow.com/q/4166493/240733 –  stakx Feb 4 at 8:36

12 Answers 12

up vote 27 down vote accepted

I don't know a Linq solution - But you can easily code the algorithm by yourself using generators (yield return).

public static IEnumerable<T> TakeAllButLast<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source) {
    var it = source.GetEnumerator();
    bool hasRemainingItems = false;
    bool isFirst = true;
    T item = default(T);

    do {
        hasRemainingItems = it.MoveNext();
        if (hasRemainingItems) {
            if (!isFirst) yield return item;
            item = it.Current;
            isFirst = false;
        }
    } while (hasRemainingItems);
}

static void Main(string[] args) {
    var Seq = Enumerable.Range(1, 10);

    Console.WriteLine(string.Join(", ", Seq.Select(x => x.ToString()).ToArray()));
    Console.WriteLine(string.Join(", ", Seq.TakeAllButLast().Select(x => x.ToString()).ToArray()));
}

Or as a generalized solution discarding the last n items (using a queue like suggested in the comments):

public static IEnumerable<T> SkipLastN<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int n) {
    var  it = source.GetEnumerator();
    bool hasRemainingItems = false;
    var  cache = new Queue<T>(n + 1);

    do {
        if (hasRemainingItems = it.MoveNext()) {
            cache.Enqueue(it.Current);
            if (cache.Count > n)
                yield return cache.Dequeue();
        }
    } while (hasRemainingItems);
}

static void Main(string[] args) {
    var Seq = Enumerable.Range(1, 4);

    Console.WriteLine(string.Join(", ", Seq.Select(x => x.ToString()).ToArray()));
    Console.WriteLine(string.Join(", ", Seq.SkipLastN(3).Select(x => x.ToString()).ToArray()));
}
share|improve this answer
3  
Now can you generalize it to take all but the final n? –  Eric Lippert Nov 22 '09 at 16:58
1  
Done ( .... 15 chars ... ) –  Dario Nov 22 '09 at 17:36
2  
Nice. One small error; queue size should be initialized to n + 1 since that is the max size of the queue. –  Eric Lippert Nov 22 '09 at 18:58

Because I think the accepted solution is less elegant than it could be, an alternative. Note that the wrapper methods are needed to let invalid arguments throw early, rather than deferring the checks until the sequence is actually enumerated.

public static IEnumerable<T> DropLast<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source)
{
    if (source == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("source");

    return InternalDropLast(source);
}

private static IEnumerable<T> InternalDropLast<T>(IEnumerable<T> source)
{
    T buffer = default(T);
    bool buffered = false;

    foreach (T x in source)
    {
        if (buffered)
            yield return buffer;

        buffer = x;
        buffered = true;
    }
}

As per Eric Lippert's suggestion, it easily generalizes to n items:

public static IEnumerable<T> DropLast<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int n)
{
    if (source == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("source");

    if (n < 0)
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("n", 
            "Argument n should be non-negative.");

    return InternalDropLast(source, n);
}

private static IEnumerable<T> InternalDropLast<T>(IEnumerable<T> source, int n)
{
    Queue<T> buffer = new Queue<T>(n + 1);

    foreach (T x in source)
    {
        buffer.Enqueue(x);

        if (buffer.Count == n + 1)
            yield return buffer.Dequeue();
    }
}

Where I now buffer before yielding instead of after it so that the n == 0 case does not need special handling.

share|improve this answer

As an alternative to creating your own method and in a case the elements order is not important, the next will work:

var result = sequence.Reverse().Skip(1);
share|improve this answer
15  
Note that this requires that you have enough memory to store the entire sequence, and of course it STILL iterates the entire sequence twice, once to build the reversed sequence and once to iterate it. Pretty much this is worse than the Count solution no matter how you slice it; it's slower AND takes far more memory. –  Eric Lippert Nov 22 '09 at 16:56
    
I don't know how the 'Reverse' method work, so I'm not sure about amount of memory it use. But I agree about two iterations. This method shouldn't be used on large collections or if a performance is important. –  Kamarey Nov 22 '09 at 17:07
3  
Well, how would you implement Reverse? Can you figure out a way in general to do it without storing the entire sequence? –  Eric Lippert Nov 22 '09 at 19:00
2  
I like it, and it does meet the criteria of not generating the sequence twice. –  David B Nov 23 '09 at 1:46
1  
and in addition you will also need to reverse the entire sequence again to keep it as it is equence.Reverse().Skip(1).Reverse() not a good solution –  AnimalsAreNotOursToEat Sep 7 '13 at 14:55

Nothing in the BCL (or MoreLinq I believe), but you could create your own extension method.

public static IEnumerable<T> TakeAllButLast<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source)
{
    var enumerator = source.GetEnumerator();
    bool first = true;
    T prev;
    while(enumerator.MoveNext())
    {
        if (!first)
            yield return prev;
        first = false;
        prev = enumerator.Current;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This code won't work... should probably be if (!first) and pull first = false out of the if. –  Caleb Nov 22 '09 at 16:17
    
This code looks off. The logic seems to be 'return the uninitialized prev in the first iteration, and loop forever after that'. –  Novelocrat Nov 22 '09 at 16:18
    
The code seems to have "compile time" error. May be you would like to correct it. But yes, we can write an extender which iterates once and returns all but the last item. –  Manish Basantani Nov 22 '09 at 16:19
    
@Caleb: You are absolutely right - I wrote this in a real rush! Fixed now. @Amby: Erm, not sure what compiler you're using. I had nothing of the sort. :P –  Noldorin Nov 22 '09 at 16:41

It would be helpful if .NET Framework was shipped with extension method like this.

public static IEnumerable<T> SkipLast<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int count)
{
    var enumerator = source.GetEnumerator();
    var queue = new Queue<T>(count + 1);

    while (true)
    {
        if (!enumerator.MoveNext())
            break;
        queue.Enqueue(enumerator.Current);
        if (queue.Count > count)
            yield return queue.Dequeue();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

if you don't have time to roll out your own extension, here's a quicker way:

var next = sequence.First();
sequence.Skip(1)
    .Select(s => 
    { 
        var selected = next;
        next = s;
        return selected;
    });
share|improve this answer

A slight expansion on Joren's elegant solution:

public static IEnumerable<T> Shrink<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int left, int right)
{
    int i = 0;
    var buffer = new Queue<T>(right + 1);

    foreach (T x in source)
    {
        if (i >= left) // Read past left many elements at the start
        {
            buffer.Enqueue(x);
            if (buffer.Count > right) // Build a buffer to drop right many elements at the end
                yield return buffer.Dequeue();    
        } 
        else i++;
    }
}
public static IEnumerable<T> WithoutLast<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int n = 1)
{
    return source.Shrink(0, n);
}
public static IEnumerable<T> WithoutFirst<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int n = 1)
{
    return source.Shrink(n, 0);
}

Where shrink implements a simple count forward to drop the first left many elements and the same discarded buffer to drop the last right many elements.

share|improve this answer

Could be:

var allBuLast = sequence.TakeWhile(e => e != sequence.Last());

I guess it should be like de "Where" but preserving the order(?).

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2  
That's a very inefficient way to do it. To evaluate sequence.Last() it has to traverse the entire sequence, doing so for each element in the sequence. O(n^2) efficiency. –  Mike Nov 22 '13 at 21:43
    
You are right. I don't know what I was thinking when I wrote this XD. Anyway, are you sure that Last() will traverse the entire sequence? For some implementations of IEnumerable (such as Array), this should be O(1). I didn't check the List implementation, but it could also have a "reverse" iterator, starting in the last element, which would take O(1) too. Also, you should take into account that O(n) = O(2n), at least technically speaking. Hence, if this procedure is not absolutely critic for your apps performance, I would stick with the much clearer sequence.Take(sequence.Count() - 1).Regards! –  Guillermo Ares Dec 20 '13 at 18:03
    
@Mike I don't agree with you mate, sequence.Last() is O(1) so that it doesn't need to traverse the entire sequence. stackoverflow.com/a/1377895/812598 –  GoRoS Jan 15 '14 at 17:17
    
@GoRoS, it's only O(1) if the sequence implements ICollection/IList or is an Array. All other sequences are O(N). In my question, I don't assume that one of the O(1) sources –  Mike Jan 15 '14 at 20:57
    
@Mike Well yes, you're right, depending on what you implement on sequence. However it seems that it's not O(1) for ICollection/IList as you said, it's just O(1) for IList only stackoverflow.com/a/18200099/812598 –  GoRoS Jan 16 '14 at 8:14

A slight variation on the accepted answer, which (for my tastes) is a bit simpler:

    public static IEnumerable<T> AllButLast<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable, int n = 1)
    {
        // for efficiency, handle degenerate n == 0 case separately 
        if (n == 0)
        {
            foreach (var item in enumerable)
                yield return item;
            yield break;
        }

        var queue = new Queue<T>(n);
        foreach (var item in enumerable)
        {
            if (queue.Count == n)
                yield return queue.Dequeue();

            queue.Enqueue(item);
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

Why not just .ToList<type>() on the sequence, then call count and take like you did originally..but since it's been pulled into a list, it shouldnt do an expensive enumeration twice. Right?

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This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. –  Jon Egerton Oct 14 '14 at 11:14

You could also use Except() to ignore the last element :

var result = sequence.Except(new List<int>() { sequence.Last() });

Of course, this works only if you're sure that all your elements are differents...

share|improve this answer
    
what if the sequence contains [1,2,3,1,2,3,1,2,3], the output of your suggestion is [1,2,1,2,1,2] since it would remove all 3's (it's the last element) –  Mike Jan 22 at 16:14
1  
Yep but in the case of this question, the elements are all differents, this is why my solution works ... I edit my answer to note it –  cdie Feb 24 at 9:52

I would probably do something like this:

sequence.Where(x => x != sequence.LastOrDefault())

This is one iteration with a check that it isn't the last one for each time though.

share|improve this answer
2  
Two reasons that's not a good thing to do. 1) .LastOrDefault() requires iterating the entire sequence, and that's called for each element in the sequence (in the .Where()). 2) If the sequence is [1,2,1,2,1,2] and you used your technique, you'd be left with [1,1,1]. –  Mike Sep 5 '12 at 13:45

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