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I'm currently trying to get my head around some of the things I can do with variadic template support. Let's say I have a function like this -

template <typename ... Args>
void foo(Args ... a)
{
    int len = sizeof...(tail);
    int vals[] = {a...};
    /* Rest of function */
}

/* Elsewhere */
foo(1, 2, 3, 4);

This code works because I assume beforehand that the arguments will be integers, but obviously will fail if I provide something else. If I know that the parameter packs will contain a particular type in advance, is there some way that I can do without the templating and have something like -

void foo(int ... a)

I have tried doing this, but the compiler gave an error about foo being a void field. I know that I can also access the parameters in the pack through recursion, but I'm not sure this will fix the problem that I have - namely I want to be able to take a variable number of arguments of the same type.

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1  
You can use enable_if to make sure all types are ints. –  Kerrek SB Jul 22 '13 at 16:07
1  
The code works if you dive it a bunch of ints. It doesn't work if you give it something else. Looks like mission accomplished. Where is the problem? –  n.m. Jul 22 '13 at 16:09
    
I guess the issue is whether it's possible to ensure that they are ints at compile time. –  znby Jul 22 '13 at 17:41
    
A static_assert would also work here, instead of enable_if. Both use is_same from <type_traits>. –  dyp Jul 22 '13 at 18:40
    
@znby If anything in the body of foo requires all the types to be ints or convertible to ints - e.g. int vals[] = {a...}; - and you code a call in which they aren't then you will know that at compiletime. –  Mike Kinghan Jul 22 '13 at 19:14
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2 Answers

If you know the types before, you can use function overload with std:initializer_list :

#include <initializer_list>
#include <iostream>

void foo( std::initializer_list<int> l )
{
    for ( auto el : l )
        // do something
}

void foo( std::initializer_list<float> l )
{
}

void foo( std::initializer_list<std::string> l )
{
}

int main()
{
    foo( {1, 2, 3, 4 } );
    foo( {1.1f, 2.1f, 3.1f, 4.1f } );
    foo( { "foo", "bar", "foo", "foo" } );
    return 0;
}

If you use Visual Studio 2012, you might need the Visual C++ Compiler November 2012 CTP.

EDIT : If you still want to use variadic template, you can do :

template <int ... Args>
void foo( )
{
    int len = sizeof...(Args);
    int vals[] = {Args...};
    // ...
}

// And

foo<1, 2, 3, 4>();

But you have to remember that it is not working with float and std::string for example : you will end with 'float': illegal type for non-type template parameter. float is not legal as a non-type template parameter, this is to do with precision, floating point numbers cannot be precisely represented, and the likelyhood of you referring to the same type can depend on how the number is represented.

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If you need to know the number of arguments at compile-time this workaround is not sufficient though, because initializer_list does not provide a constexpr size() member. AFAIK, there is no way around variadic templates with is_same<>/is_convertible<> checks. –  user2523017 Jul 23 '13 at 7:32
    
@user2523017 You are right, with this solution we can't have the number of arguments at compile time. –  Pierre Fourgeaud Jul 23 '13 at 8:12
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I'm currently trying to get my head around some of the things I can do with variadic template support.

Assuming that you want to experiment with variadic templates, not find any solution to your problem, then I suggest taking a look at the code below:

#include <iostream>

template<int ...Values>
void foo2()
{
    int len = sizeof...(Values);
    int vals[] = {Values...};

    for (int i = 0; i < 4; ++i)
        std::cout << vals[i] << std::endl;
}

int main()
{
    foo2<1, 2, 3, 4>();

    return 0;
}

The difference between foo2 and your foo is that you pass the parameters to foo at runtime, and to foo2 at compilation time, so for every parameter set you use, compiler will generate separate foo2 function body.

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