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There is a way to put ruby conditions inside javascript block? i.e.

javascript:
  var config = {
      common_value_1 : 1, 
      common_value_2 : 2 
  };
  - if my_value === true # this must be a ruby condition
    config.custom_true_value_1 = "1" ;
    config.custom_true_value_2 = "#{my_value}" ;
  - else
    config.custom_false_value_1 = "1" ;
    config.custom_false_value_2 = "#{my_value}" ;

Or is there another workaround at this problem? Because the ugly way that I can use its:

javascript:
    var config = {
      common_value_1 : 1, 
      common_value_2 : 2 
    };
- if my_value === true # this must be a ruby condition
  javascript:
    config.custom_true_value_1 = "1" ;
    config.custom_true_value_2 = "#{my_value}" ;
- else
  javascript:
    config.custom_false_value_1 = "1" ;
    config.custom_false_value_2 = "#{my_value}" ;

But I don't like it because if config has common values between if and else then I would duplicate my code and would be much larger and hard to maintain.

Updated with better examples

share|improve this question
    
why if-else part assigning same values? is it OK? –  Arup Rakshit Jul 22 '13 at 18:09
1  
Testing against literal true is an odd thing to do. Why isn't if my_value sufficient? –  tadman Jul 22 '13 at 18:16
    
I just don't explain well myself, look at the updated question, thanks... –  norman784 Jul 22 '13 at 18:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can use an style similar to string interpolate. Se example below.

javascript:
  var config = { 
    custom: "#{my_value ? 'truthy' : 'falsy'}",
    current_user: #{raw current_user.to_json}
  };

** Update below **

If you want an more advanced configuration i would recommend to create an class, for example

class ClientConfig
  attr_accessor :foo, :bar

  # .. code

  def to_json
    { foo: foo, bar: bar }.to_json
  end
end

# in view file
javascript: 
  var config = ClientConfig.new.to_json

Else you also have the opportunity to create an ruby partial I've created an example below who may not be so beautiful but i works.

# template_path/_config.html.ruby
def configuration
  { foo: "Hello", bar: "World" }
end

def july_special
  { june_key: "It's June" }
end

def month_name
  Date.today.strftime("%B")
end

config = month_name == 'July' ? configuration.merge(july_special) : configuration

content_tag :script, config.to_json.html_safe

# viewfile
= render 'template_path/config'

So my point is that theres multiply ways of doing this and you should try to find the way thats suite you and your application the most. In my case I would use my first example (before the update) if i just need one or two values else i would go for the class ClientConfig

share|improve this answer
    
what about if I want to add different keys in each case, I update my question, seems that I don't explain well myself the first time –  norman784 Jul 22 '13 at 18:42
    
Se updated answer for some more alternatives. –  aross Jul 22 '13 at 19:21
    
seems fair to me... thanks... –  norman784 Jul 22 '13 at 21:22

In pure Slim you don't have raw nor html_safe. In those cases, simply use double curly braces as documented here:

javascript:
  var data = #{{ JSON.dump([{x: 1, y:2}]) }};
share|improve this answer

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