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I have texts that can contain mathematical expressions where 1x can occur, or more general, a 1 followed by a letter. What I'm trying to do is rewrite the math within the text with a regular expression so that all occurrences of 1x are replaced by x, but not so that ie. 21x becomes 2x. Also, the math within the text is within # delimiters and the 1x should only be replace when it is between the delimiters.

An example text is:

"As a 1st step, you can rewrite #21x*x - 1y# is equal to #1z + 1#"

this must become

"As a 1st step, you can rewrite #21x^2 - y# is equal to #z + 1#"

What I have so far as a regular expression pattern is

'/(#.*?)(\D?)1([a-z])(.*?#)/i'

and as a replacement

'$1$2$3$4'

but it does not do the job. Any help on the pattern would be appreciated.

Thanks

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1  
What language of regex are you using? –  BlackVegetable Jul 22 '13 at 19:47
    
I'm using php as a language –  mmzc Jul 22 '13 at 20:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

For the example you gave, you could use this:

\b1([a-z])

And replace all occurrences/matches with $1.

Demo.

EDIT: There was a misunderstanding with the question, so, a regex that can be used so that 1st is not substituted as well:

\b1([a-z])(?=[^#]*#[^#]*(?:[^#]*#[^#]*#[^#]*)*$)

Demo.

(?=[^#]*#[^#]*(?:[^#]*#[^#]*#[^#]*)*$) basically makes sure that there are an odd number of hashes ahead.

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thanks, but the example did not come through correctly. It's a bit more complicated –  mmzc Jul 22 '13 at 20:07
1  
@user761411 Do you have more than one equation per line? If you have only one, you could try this, which uses the regex (?![^#]*#[^#]*#)\b1([a-z])(?=[^#]*#). –  Jerry Jul 22 '13 at 20:14
1  
Yes, a lot more occurrences per line can occur. –  mmzc Jul 22 '13 at 20:22
    
@user761411 I updated my answer. –  Jerry Jul 22 '13 at 20:23
    
@user761411 Another thing: you will probably require another separate function to replace the x*x by x^2. If you have only squares, you could do this. Otherwise, I don't think regex is the best way for this substitution. –  Jerry Jul 22 '13 at 20:26

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