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I have a HashSet of Objs with Obj defined as such:

public class Obj 
{
    private int _id;
    private string _desc;
    private int _sum;

    public int Id
    {
        get { return _id; }
        set { _id = value; }
    }

    public string Description
    {
        get { return _desc; }
        set { _desc = value; }
    }

    public int Sum
    {
        get { return _sum; }
        set { _sum = value; }
    }

    public Obj(int id, string desc, int sum)
    {
        _id = id;
        _sum = sum;
        _desc = desc;
    }

    public override bool Equals(Obj other)
    {
        return this._sum == other._sum 
            && this._desc == other._desc;
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        int hash = 13;
        hash = (hash * 7) + _sum.GetHashCode();
        hash = (hash * 7) + _desc.GetHashCode();

        return hash;
    }
}

This works fine but I'm having trouble retrieving from the HashSet when HashSet.Add(obj) returns false. What would be the best way to retrieve the _id of the Obj that is already contained in the HashSet in such a case?

share|improve this question
    
Double _s? Mistake or not? –  It'sNotALie. Jul 22 '13 at 20:46
2  
Any reason for the private variables. You could just do public int ID {get;set;} –  gunr2171 Jul 22 '13 at 20:47
    
@newStackExchangeInstance Sorry that was a typo. –  ashishduh Jul 22 '13 at 20:47
    
@user2246674 HashSet has no Get method, or TryGet method, or anything like it; that's the root of the problem here. –  Servy Jul 22 '13 at 20:49
1  
There is subtle error in your code. HashCode and Equals should always be same for an object. In your case, you calculate both from Sum and Description, yet you are able to change both. This can cause errors if you add an Obj into a HashSet and then change either of those. Make them read-only to ensure no such error happens. –  Euphoric Jul 22 '13 at 20:53

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The way i see it : sum + description (used for hashcode, equals) = key and _id (what you want to retrieve) = value.

The scenario clearly points to a dictionary rather than a hashset.... sets aren't meant for arbitrary lookup/retrieval.

share|improve this answer
    
But OP doesn’t really want a dictionary, they want to retrieve a canonical element. Sure, this can be phrased as a mapping. But set lookup would be much more straightforward. (But I agree that using a Dictionary is the best practical solution here). –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 22 '13 at 21:13
    
I ended up going with Dictionary. Doesn't make so much logical sense given my data setup but practically it makes sense as Konrad Rudolph says. –  ashishduh Jul 22 '13 at 22:17
myHashSet.First(x => x.Equals(myItemToRetrieve)).Id;

Another way to do this is to use a Dictionary (keys equal values):

(assuming you have converted it):

Obj temp;
if (theDictionary.TryGetValue(myItemToRetrieve, out temp))
{
    int ID = temp.Id;
}
else
{
    theDictionary[myItemToRetrieve] = myItemToRetrieve;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The problem with this solution is it's complexity for iteration (Used with First) –  Cédric Bignon Jul 22 '13 at 20:50
1  
@Servy With a proper hash set maybe. Not with RetardedHashSet which ships with .NET under the alias HashSet. –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 22 '13 at 20:56
3  
@KonradRudolph To be fair, this is an extraordinary odd request to have to begin with; generally there's no point in a Get method of a set, and there's the simple enough workaround of just using a Dictionary<T, T> instead that's not too cumbersome. Removing methods that generally won't be used can be helpful. –  Servy Jul 22 '13 at 20:59
1  
@KonradRudolph I'm not saying it never makes sense, just that it usually doesn't. Needing to do this is very rare. I use HashSets constantly, and I've yet to be in a position in which I missed this method. I'm not saying it's wrong to be in a position where you want to do this, it's just very unusual and uncommon, or to use another word "odd". –  Servy Jul 22 '13 at 21:05
1  
@Servy I get it. I still maintain that HashSet showcases incredibly poor API design here. I’m all for concise interfaces, but this doesn’t strike me as a reasonable restriction, especially since it’s not simply a missing shortcut, it’s making an operation impossible just by not exposing one public method (which already exists as a private operation), and which requires essentially replicating the whole class in order to implement. –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 22 '13 at 21:11

You could define your own collection type that builds on Dictionary<TKey, TValue> and provides a GetOrAdd method (similar to the GetOrAdd of ConcurrentDictionary<TKey, TValue>):

public partial class HashDictionary<T> : Dictionary<T, T>
{
    public T GetOrAdd(T newItem)
    {
        T oldItem;
        if (this.TryGetValue(newItem, out oldItem))
            return oldItem;

        this.Add(newItem, newItem);
        return newItem;
    }
}

To use this, you would call:

Obj presentO = myHashDictionary.GetOrAdd(newO);
if (presentO == newO)
{
    // The item was not already present, and has been added.
}
else
{
    // A collision occurred, and presentO points to the existent item.
    int alreadyContainedID = presentO.ID;
}

In order to preserve compatibility with your current code, you could extend this class to implement ICollection<T> (or, preferably, ISet<T>) too:

public partial class HashDictionary<T> : ICollection<T>
{        
    public void Add(T item)
    {
        this.GetOrAdd(item);
    }

    public bool Contains(T item)
    {
        return this.ContainsKey(item);
    }

    public void CopyTo(T[] array, int arrayIndex)
    {
        this.Keys.CopyTo(array, arrayIndex);
    }

    public bool IsReadOnly
    {
        get { return false; }
    }

    public new IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return this.Keys.GetEnumerator();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I have had troubles with this situation in the past. Granted, I was using a Dictionary<TKey,TValue>, which makes it easier to get the object based on a key. When you override the hashcode, one problem is that Hashtables and such store the record according to the INITIAL values. So if you fiddle with the object a bit, you will no longer be able to recover the object because the hash code has changed. So the trick that I used was to have an integer hash code with a separate method like

private hashcode;

public void UpdateHashCode(){
   hashcode = // your original logic here.

}

That way, you can control when the hashcode gets updated, so that you can still find your old object. remove it from the dictionary, then update your object, then store the modified object.

But purists won't like that since it means strict equality testing and hash testing won't work correctly on modified objects that haven't had their hash updated. So instead, you can just track the old hash code as a separate property that only gets updated when you are adding it to the dictionary.

private int oldHashcode;

public int OldHashcode{
   get{
       return oldHashCode;
   }
   set {
       oldHashCode = value;
   }
}

And when you add to the dictionary:

item.OldHashCode = item.GetHashCode();

And to retrieve

item = myDictionary[item.OldHashCode];

or whatever.

share|improve this answer
    
That isn’t really OP’s question although it’s true. In OP’s case, however, the Id simply doesn’t form part of the object identity. The rest remains unchanged, and so does the object’s hash value. –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 22 '13 at 20:59
    
Ah, I assumed he already knew how to get an object back out of the HashSet in principle, but was having problems. –  Ted Jul 22 '13 at 21:13

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