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I learned how to send additional parameters to a thread on a related post, but now i would like to know if i can get back the data(processed by the thread) back into the calling function!

I am writing a program in which i need to use a thread that continuously puts user input into a string variable. The problem is that i don't know how to get the string variable data back to the main() where it is displayed (graphically). And so (i prefer that) the getting of user input and the Displaying of the string be done independently (since they need to be looped at different rates : say...30 fps for user input and 16 fps for display)

i hope i am clear

Here is an ideal problematic situation(but not one that i need a solution to):

typedef struct
{
    int a,b;
}ThreadData;

int avg(void* data)
{
    ThreadData* tdata=(ThreadData*)data;

    int processed_average=(tdata->a+tdata->b)/2.0;
    //this is what i want to send back to the main()

    return 0;
}
void main()
{
    int a=10,b=20;
    SDL_Thread* mythread=SDL_CreateThread(avg,myThreadData);

    cout<<"The average of a and b is ";    //i dont know what to put here!
}

Forgive me for any syntax errors in my demo

As a conclusive question :

How to get the current contents of a string that is continuously updated by a thread (using a loop) back into the main() which contains another loop that continuously updates the screen (graphically) with the current(latest) contents of the string?

share|improve this question
    
Since the whole point of threads is to run things asynchronously, I'm not sure what you expect to be able to do at that point without join-ing first. –  Dave Jul 22 '13 at 21:38
    
You'll need to join the thread to safely access the results. Joining will synchronize you with the return from the thread function (Note: The return value might be irrelevant here! Place an intended result to the structure passed to the thread function, and fill in from there). –  πάντα ῥεῖ Jul 22 '13 at 21:40
    
I'd guess the sdl tag was missing to make the context more clear ... –  πάντα ῥεῖ Jul 22 '13 at 21:43
    
"i need to use a thread that continuously puts user input into a string" ... "since they need to be looped at different rates". There's no looping going on in your code. A thread doesn't loop by itself, it is simply a means to asynchronously execute something in parallel. –  Snps Jul 22 '13 at 22:30
1  
@reubenjohn If you are just experimenting with multithreaded programming then I recommend using std::thread from the standard library. No need to use any external library since threading support was introduced in C++11. –  Snps Jul 22 '13 at 22:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A decent pattern for inter thread communication is a message queue - you can implement one with a mutex, a list and a condition variable - one use an off the shelf variant. Here are some implementations you can look at:

You would then have the thread push data onto the queue - and in main pop data from the queue.


Edit 1: in response to the OP's edit.

If you have a single string that has to be edited by the thread and then rendered by main it is best to just use std::string, protect all access to it with a mutex, and then use a condition variable to signal the main thread when the string changes. Will try and write some sample code for you in a minute.


Edit 2: Sample code as promised:

#include <SDL/SDL.h>
#include <SDL/SDL_thread.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <stdexcept>

class SdlMutex
{
public:
    SdlMutex()
    {
        mutex = SDL_CreateMutex();
        if ( !mutex ) throw std::runtime_error( "SDL_CreateMutex == NULL" );
    }

    ~SdlMutex()
    {
        SDL_DestroyMutex( mutex );
    }

    void lock()
    {
        if( SDL_mutexP( mutex ) == -1 ) throw std::runtime_error( "SDL_mutexP == -1" );
        //  Note:
        //      -1 does not mean it was already locked - it means there was an error in locking -
        //      if it was locked it will just block - see SDL_mutexP(3)
    }

    void unlock()
    {
        if ( SDL_mutexV( mutex ) == -1 ) throw std::runtime_error( "SDL_mutexV == -1" );
    }

    SDL_mutex* underlying()
    {
        return mutex;
    }
private:
    SDL_mutex* mutex;
};

class SdlScopedLock
{
public:
    SdlScopedLock( SdlMutex& mutex )
        :
            mutex( mutex )
    {
        mutex.lock();
    }
    ~SdlScopedLock()
    {
        try
        {
            this->unlock();
        }
        catch( const std::exception& e )
        {
            // Destructors should never throw ...
            std::cerr << "SdlScopedLock::~SdlScopedLock - caught : " << e.what() << std::endl;
        }
    }
    void unlock()
    {
        mutex.unlock();
    }
private:
    SdlMutex& mutex;
};

class ThreadData
{
public:
    ThreadData()
        :
            dataReady( false ),
            done( false )
    {
        condition = SDL_CreateCond();
    }

    ~ThreadData()
    {
        SDL_DestroyCond( condition );
    }

    // Using stringstream so I can just shift on integers...
    std::stringstream data;
    bool dataReady;
    bool done;
    SdlMutex mutex;
    SDL_cond* condition;
};

int threadFunction( void* data )
{
    try
    {
        ThreadData* threadData = static_cast< ThreadData* >( data );

        for ( size_t i = 0; i < 100; i++ )
        {
            {
                SdlScopedLock lock( threadData->mutex );
                // Everything in this scope is now syncronized with the mutex
                if ( i != 0 ) threadData->data << ", ";
                threadData->data << i;
                threadData->dataReady = true;
            } // threadData->mutex is automatically unlocked here
            // Its important to note that condition should be signaled after mutex is unlocked
            if ( SDL_CondSignal( threadData->condition ) == -1 ) throw std::runtime_error( "Failed to signal" );
        }
        {
            SdlScopedLock lock( threadData->mutex );
            threadData->done = true;
        }
        if ( SDL_CondSignal( threadData->condition ) == -1 ) throw std::runtime_error( "Failed to signal" );
        return 0;
    }
    catch( const std::exception& e )
    {
        std::cerr << "Caught : " << e.what() << std::endl;
        return 1;
    }
}

int main()
{
    ThreadData threadData;
    SDL_Thread* thread = SDL_CreateThread( threadFunction, &threadData );

    while ( true )
    {
        SdlScopedLock lock( threadData.mutex );
        while ( threadData.dataReady == false && threadData.done == false )
        {
            // NOTE: must call condition wait with mutex already locked
            if ( SDL_CondWait( threadData.condition, threadData.mutex.underlying() ) == -1 ) throw std::runtime_error( "Failed to wait" );
        }
        // once dataReady == true or threadData.done == true we get here
        std::cout << "Got data = " << threadData.data.str() << std::endl;
        threadData.data.str( "" );
        threadData.dataReady = false;
        if ( threadData.done )
        {
            std::cout << "child done - ending" << std::endl;
            break;
        }
    }

    int status = 99;
    SDL_WaitThread( thread, &status );
    std::cerr << "Thread completed with : " << status << std::endl;
}

Edit 3: And then the cage comes down...

You should probbably not use SDL thread support in C++, or atleast wrap it in some RAII classes - for example, in the above code - if an exception is throw - you should ensure mutex is unlocked. I will update sample with RAII, but there are many better options to SDL thread helpers. (NOTE: Edit 4 adds RAII - so now mutex is unlocked when an exception is thrown)


Edit 4: Code is now safer - still make sure you do error checks - and basically: don't use SDL threads in C++ - use boost::thread or std::thread.

share|improve this answer
    
Side note: for simple numerical calculations something like OpenMP is probbably better suited. –  Iwan Aucamp Jul 22 '13 at 21:55
    
If you read the second para(which i added), you will realize that a notification/message queue will not be appropriate as the string will need to be updated many times a second filling the queue rapidly (from what i read in some links you provided) . But its implications interest me. –  reubenjohn Jul 22 '13 at 22:13
    
you solution may be exactly what i am looking for! i am waiting on you sample code as i have made such an attempt in the past and failed (having problems with condition variables). I will reside for the moment, but i am keenly waiting for your sample code! –  reubenjohn Jul 22 '13 at 22:54
    
@reubenjohn - added sample code –  Iwan Aucamp Jul 22 '13 at 23:12
    
I tried out your sample code in my eclipse IDE, it worked perfectly Thank you! But the main() was missing a return statement, and i had to also add int argc, char* args[] parameters for the main() to run. Also i would appreciate some clarification: (1) what is the difference between ThreadData* threadData = static_cast< ThreadData* >( data ); and ThreadData* threadData = ( ThreadData* )( data ); (2) Does ` SdlScopedLock( SdlMutex& mutex ) : mutex( mutex ){//more code...}` initiate the private mutex data-member (the alias/reference) with the mutex passed as parameter? –  reubenjohn Jul 23 '13 at 8:51

I think you want SDL_WaitThread.

void SDL_WaitThread(SDL_Thread *thread, int *status);

The return code for the thread function is placed in the area pointed to by status, if status is not NULL.

Have your avg function return the average.

share|improve this answer
    
The status can only be an int, so surely he should return the average by sending a float pointer to the method instead… –  Dave Jul 22 '13 at 21:43
    
If you read the second para(which i added), you will realize that your solution will not be appropriate. I need to get back string data. –  reubenjohn Jul 22 '13 at 22:15
    
@Dave could you please elaborate on "sending a float pointer"? I added the 2nd para to my original post(please have a look)... U introduced an interesting point. Is it possible to (1) send a pointer to a string to the thread (2) get the thread to add the latest user input to the string (3) access this string using the pointer from the main() ? if so, i think this may be the solution to my question! (although not as elegant as i originally expected) –  reubenjohn Jul 22 '13 at 22:24

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