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So I have this part of my code:

void safeInput( int *n, int low, int up )      
{                                            
    while ( !( cin >> *n ) || ( low != -1 ? *n < low : false ) || ( up != -1 ? *n > up : false  )) {

            if ( cin.fail() ) {
                    cin.clear();
                    cin.ignore( std::numeric_limits<std::streamsize>::max(), '\n' );
            }

            if ( cin.eof() ) {
                    cin.clear();
            }

            cout << "Invalid input. Please try again.\n";
    }

    cin.ignore( 1 );
}

Just to clarify the 3rd line, low and up are lower and upper bounds for the allowed values of n. Those are specified in the function call. A value of -1 means infinity (unlimited above or below).

Anyways, my problem is that this function manages to catch errors when the user enters a character, like 'a', '@@' or most other gibberish. But if the user enters ^D (EOF) then the program still falls in an endless loop, even though I did use cin.eof() and cin.clear(). What could be the problem?

EDIT:

To clarify what happens in the program, here's a sample prompt and user input:

Enter row size: 1
Enter column size: a
Invalid input. Please try again.
-1
Invalid input. Please try again.
^D
Invalid input. Please try again.
Invalid input. Please try again.
Invalid input. Please try again.
Invalid input. Please try again.
Invalid input. Please try again.
Invalid input. Please try again.
...

and so on forever. I don't mind the user being done with its input, but how do I avoid the endless printing of "Invalid input. Please try again." with no prompting in-between?

share|improve this question
    
You clear the EOF flag, but you're still at the end of input, so as soon as you try to read from cin, the EOF flag gets set again. No? –  ruakh Jul 22 '13 at 22:21
    
Well that might be the case. Then how can I tell cin that I'm not at the end of the input? The user isn't supposed to enter ^D, so cin should keep working. –  Tob Ernack Jul 23 '13 at 0:56
    
Surely it's up to the user, rather than the program, to decide when the user is done providing input? –  ruakh Jul 23 '13 at 4:32
    
Ok, I edited my original post. Maybe it will make more sense. Thank you. –  Tob Ernack Jul 23 '13 at 12:48
    
Instead of calling cin.clear(), just throw an exception. –  ruakh Jul 23 '13 at 14:52

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