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Is it better to validate user input using this method

if (obj == null) {
   // detects null and undefined
   // exit the function, input not validated
}

or this method

if (!obj) {
    // detects false, 0, -0, '', null, undefined, NaN
    // exit the function, input not validated
}

In this particular case, obj represents an array to be looped through.

I'm having difficulty deciding which method to use.

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closed as too broad by Andy Ray, Mathletics, Samuel Liew, Soner Gönül, Eric Brown Jul 23 '13 at 6:25

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Google for javascript strict equals and close this question –  Andy Ray Jul 22 '13 at 22:19
1  
@AndyRay It's not strict equality (===) in either case. The OP also acknowledges that the conditionals match different values (which also makes this more of a subjective question ..) –  user2246674 Jul 22 '13 at 22:20
1  
@stack_temp: How can it "user input" and "an array"? I've only seen users input strings somewhere, so what do you mean by "represent" (have you parsed it already)? –  Bergi Jul 22 '13 at 22:24
1  
let us continue this discussion in chat –  Mathletics Jul 22 '13 at 22:28
1  
Rollbacked. Do not remove your post this way. –  soon Jul 23 '13 at 15:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

to be honest, since javascript is interpreted anyway, the overhead of the operation is huge compared to actually evaluating it, so it doesn't matter. You can always test by doing it a million times in a loop and timing which is faster.

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You've described the differences. So it's up to you - do you want false or '' to pass your conditional or not?

For an array, you may want to consider:

if (obj && obj.length) {
    // Your array is not null, and has items.
}
share|improve this answer
    
@stack_temp If you're worried that length might give you a non-number, sure. If you go this route, and still want to validate that it's not an empty array, you'd have to go a step further with (obj && obj.length && obj.length === +obj.length). You could take it another step further and ensure that the type is an array. Personally, I'd stick with simplicity - knowing that the length is "truthy" would be good enough for me. –  Joe Enos Jul 23 '13 at 0:54

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