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I'm having a tough time understanding and using closures (yes, I have read How do JavaScript closures work?)

My problem is as follows:

for (row = 0; row < 10; row++) {
    for (column = 0; column < 10; column++) {

        var target = $("#" + Data.Row[row].Column[column].ID);

        target.mouseenter(function () {
            var position = CalculatePosition($(this));

            alert("row:" + row + ",column:" + column);

            ...
        });
    }
}

As you might expect, row and column is always 9 whenever target has the mouse over it. My question is then, how can I freeze the value of row and column so that the mouseevent anonymous function can get their intended values? I tried doing something like

target.mouseenter(function() {}.bind(column));

And that seems to work for just column, but then of course this is no longer referring to target.

share|improve this question
    
Nah, bind does something different which you can't use here (also read about the this keyword) – Bergi Jul 22 '13 at 22:31
    
@Bergi He can use bind like: function(row, column){}.bind(target, row, column). – Paulpro Jul 22 '13 at 22:32
    
I suspect you want the function to know which element was clicked and each element has a different ID. True? – Lee Meador Jul 22 '13 at 22:32
    
@Paulpro: Ah, didn't see that he knows this/target[0] outside of the handler already. Wouldn't have worked for larger collections at least… – Bergi Jul 22 '13 at 22:34
up vote 4 down vote accepted

The easiest option here is generally to define a function that returns your handler:

function getHandler(row, column)
    return function () {
        var position = CalculatePosition($(this));
        alert("row:" + row + ",column:" + column);
        // ...
    };
}

Then call this function in your loop to get your handler with the relevant variables "fixed" to their values at call time:

for (row = 0; row < 10; row++) {
    for (column = 0; column < 10; column++) {
        var target = $("#" + Data.Row[row].Column[column].ID);
        target.mouseenter(getHandler(row, column));
    }
}

You can also do this within the loop, in an immediately executing anonymous function:

for (row = 0; row < 10; row++) {
    for (column = 0; column < 10; column++) {
        var target = $("#" + Data.Row[row].Column[column].ID);
        target.mouseenter((function(row, column) {
            return function () {
                var position = CalculatePosition($(this));

                alert("row:" + row + ",column:" + column);

                ...
            };
        })(row, column)));
    }
}

But IMO that's a lot uglier and harder to read.

In either case, the basic approach here is to establish a new function scope, using the loop variables as arguments; now when you use them in the handler callback, they're no longer references to outer-scope variables.

share|improve this answer
    
Basically an example of this: jsfiddle.net/ZeFxg – Ian Jul 22 '13 at 22:33
1  
+1 This works by creating a new closure for each iteration through the loops and that closure contains the mouse enter handler too. That way the handler for each element has its own stored x and y values. – Lee Meador Jul 22 '13 at 22:35
    
Thanks! The solution makes a lot more sense in my head now. – Technolar Jul 22 '13 at 22:43

You can use bind like so (the first argument is the context (this arg)):

target.mouseenter(function(row, column){
    ...
}.bind(target[0], row, column));

But bind is not cross browser, and you are already using jQuery, so you should use proxy instead:

target.mouseenter($.proxy(function(row, column){
    ...
}, target[0], row, column));
share|improve this answer
    
Yet you should use target[0] to get the DOM element only, or remove $() from this inside the handler. – Bergi Jul 22 '13 at 22:36
    
@Bergi Thanks, I didn't notice that target was a jQuery object (I assumed it was e.target from some event handler). I've updated it to use target[0]. – Paulpro Jul 22 '13 at 22:37

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