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I'm trying to apply the solution I found here to generate machine learning models:

Here's a dummy data set:

data_pred <- data.frame(x1 = 1:10, x2 = 11:20, x3 = 21:30)
data_resp <- data.frame(y1 = c(1:5, NA, 7:10), y2 = c(NA, 2, NA, 4:10))

Here was my for() loop method of modeling the predictors in data_pred on each individual column of measured responses in data_resp using the caret package:

# data_pred contains predictors
# data_resp contains one column per measurement
# 1 matching row per observation in both data_pred and data_resp

for (i in 1:ncol(data_resp)) {

   train(x = data_pred[!is.na(data_resp[, i]), ],
         y = data_resp[!is.na(data_resp[, i], i],
         ... )
}

Now I'm trying to do the same with lapply, which I think has numerous advantages. I'm having an issue with translating the !is.na() criteria on the fly so that I'm only modeling with non-NA cases for each response. Here was my initial function to test the lapply method:

rf_func <- function(y) {
  train(x = data_pred,
        y = y,
        method = "rf",
        tuneGrid = data.frame(.mtry = 3:6),
        nodesize = 3,
        ntrees = 500,
        trControl = trControl) }

Then create an empty list to store results and apply the function to data_resp:

models <- list(NULL)
models$rf <- lapply(as.list(data_resp), rf_func)

That works fine since randomForest can handle NAs, but other methods cannot, so I need to remove those rows from each data_resp element as well as the corresponding rows from my predictors.

I tried this without success:

train(x = data_pred_scale[!is.na(y), ],
      y = y[!is.na(y)],
      ... }

I also tried y[[!is.na(y)]]

How do I translate the data.frame method (df[!is.na(df2), ]) to lapply?

share|improve this question
    
This is a rather weird setup. Most people have one y-variable, and want to train models based on different combinations of the x-variables. You're doing the opposite. –  Hong Ooi Jul 23 '13 at 3:05
    
@HongOoi I have a set of xs and numerous measured responses, ys. I'd like to use the xs to predict each of the ys, one at a time. Think of chemical formulas. Imagine I formulate a compound with various ingredients (xs) and want to model the resultant viscosity at various temps, modulus, melting point, etc. Does that make more sense? Figuring out which xs to use is a different (and important) question -- but I would still need to model a subset of xs against against each y, which is what I'm trying to do above. –  Hendy Jul 23 '13 at 4:01
    
No problem, I was just curious. –  Hong Ooi Jul 23 '13 at 4:22

2 Answers 2

several different ways to go about it. A simple approach is with an anonymous function:

 lapply(data_resp, function(x) rf_func(x[!is.na(x)]))
share|improve this answer
    
That takes care of ensuring that each element of data_resp is subset properly. For data_pred, would I just use data_pred[y, ]? It seems that this is going to put non-NA values of each data_resp column into my function (which I've defined as taking y... how do I then remove the corresponding omitted rows from my predictors? –  Hendy Jul 23 '13 at 0:03

In fiddling around quite a bit with a single element of my as.list(data_frame) to simulate what lapply would be passing, I came up with this, which I think is working:

rf_func <- function(y) {
  train(x = data_pred_scale[!(unlist(lapply(y, is.na))), ], 
        y = y[!(unlist(lapply(y, is.na)))], 
        method = "rf",
        tuneGrid = data.frame(.mtry = 3:6),
        nodesize = 3,
        ntrees = 500,
        trControl = trControl) }

models$rf <- lapply(as.list(data_resp), rf_func)

It does seem to be working. I [hackishly] compared the non-NA data set to the trainingData results in each caret model like so:

nas <- NULL
for(i in 1:ncol(data_resp)) {nas <- c(nas, length(data_resp[!is.na(data_resp[, i]), i]))}

model_nas <- NULL
for(i in 1:length(nas)) {model_nas <- c(model_nas, nrow(models$rf[[i]]$trainingData))}

identical(nas, model_nas)
[1] TRUE

So, is y[!unlist(lapply(y, is.na)))] the best/most elegant way to do this sort of thing It's pretty ugly...


Edit: Based on @Ricardo Saporta 's answer, I was able to come up with this (probably obvious to the veterans, but bear with me):

rf_func <- function(x, y) {
  train(x = x,
        y = y,
        method = "rf",
        tuneGrid = data.frame(.mtry = 3:6),
        nodesize = 3,
        ntrees = 500,
        trControl = trControl) }

models$rf <- lapply(data_resp, function (y) {
  rf_func(data_pred_scale[!is.na(y), ], y[!is.na(y)] ) 
  }
)

Is there still a better way, or is that fairly decent? (Certainly prettier than my first mess up above.)

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