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The interpreter and dynamic compiler would be for testing/prototyping and when im done testing i use the static compiler.

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Weird stuff: I think this is exactly what QuickBasic has been touted to be –  EFraim Nov 22 '09 at 20:46

3 Answers 3

Java has all of these - the stock Sun JVM has both an interpreter and dynamic compiler, and the GNU Compiler for Java (GCJ) can statically compile to machine code.

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There are many.

One such language is Objective Caml. Let's check it against your requirements:

The bigger question is finding the best tool for your job. Many languages meet those requirements, but the most used languages have the best documentation and the most tested bindings to libraries. If you're going to use a language like Caml, there should be some overriding benefit to that language that can't be found in other languages.

Good luck!

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does it have a library for networking? –  Soup Nov 23 '09 at 0:44
    
Many: see caml.inria.fr/cgi-bin/hump.en.cgi?sort=0&browse=4 and the links on the right side of the screen. –  Chip Uni Nov 23 '09 at 5:29

The best option for you depends on the kind of your application. If it is a real-time program, then just stay with C++ (or ever with C) because no high-level language like Ruby/Perl/Python will beat them in this domain. But if the complexity of your future program is high enough, the best option I see in Python + PyOpenGL (for graphics) +PyOpenAL (for sound) and PyODE (for real-time physics). Actually, Python's VM is fast enough but you can also (with some efforts) compile it into a platform-dependent optimized code.

Alternatively you can use PyGame for 2D graphics and a way comfortable sound/music management.

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