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Sorry if my question is poorly worded, but it is precisely because I don't know how to word the question that I can't easily search this on google.

Basically I just want to combine these two functions but couldn't find a generic example with a generic inside the of a parameter? What do I call the bracketed area of a parameter? is type specifier a real term?

anyway I want to combine them into one function that takes two keyvaluepair<int, T> but I can't seem to get the syntax right.

public class BinarySearchComparers:IComparer<KeyValuePair<int, string>>, IComparer<KeyValuePair<int, byte>>
  {
    public int Compare(KeyValuePair<int, string> x, KeyValuePair<int, string> y)
    {
      return x.Key.CompareTo(y.Key); 
    }
    public int Compare(KeyValuePair<int, byte> x, KeyValuePair<int, byte> y)
    {
      return x.Key.CompareTo(y.Key);
    }
  }
share|improve this question
    
What does "with a generic inside the of a parameter" mean? – Cédric Bignon Jul 23 '13 at 1:18
1  
If I correctly understand what you're trying to do, I'm not sure if you can do this. Specifying a generic type T to represent string, and a second generic type U to represent byte in your example would lead to a "cannot implement both because they may unify for some type parameter substitutions". See this and this. – Chris Sinclair Jul 23 '13 at 1:21
public class BinarySearchComparers<T> : IComparer<KeyValuePair<int, T>>  // Declares a generic type
{
    public int Compare(KeyValuePair<int, T> x, KeyValuePair<int, T> y)
    {
        return x.Key.CompareTo(y.Key); 
    }
}

Is it what you want?

Update

Given Chris Sinclair understanding of your question, the solution might be:

public class BinarySearchComparers<U, T> : IComparer<KeyValuePair<U, T>>  // Declares a generic type
    where U : IComparable<U>  // Restricts the type U to implémentations of IComparable<U> (necessary to call CompareTo)
{
    public int Compare(KeyValuePair<U, T> x, KeyValuePair<U, T> y)
    {
        return x.Key.CompareTo(y.Key); 
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think he wants to specify two parameters T and U to implement two different IComparer interfaces on the same class. – Chris Sinclair Jul 23 '13 at 1:23
    
@ChrisSinclair I'm not so sure. The key is always int, and that's all he's using of the KeyValuePairs. – Katana314 Jul 23 '13 at 1:24

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