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I'm working on solving a programming praxis problem, and am going back to C for kicks to brush up. Anyway, I'm having bugs with an array I'm getting via calloc. The array I'm getting back isn't being initialized to zero. Here's an excerpt of my code, along with the output it's producing. I'm afraid I might just be missing something painfully obvious or idiosyncratic.

int * check_digits;
    // For loop iterating over all numbers with fangsize digits
    for (int i = smallest_fang; i < largest_fang; i++) {

        char fang1_word[N];
        sprintf(fang1_word, "%d", i);

        for (int j = i; j < largest_fang; j++) {

            int dracula;
            char dracula_word[N];
            char fang2_word[N];

            check_digits = (int *) calloc((size_t) N, (size_t) sizeof(int));
            printf("HELLO\n");
            for (int arg = 0; arg < 10; arg++) {
                printf("%d\n", check_digits[arg]);
            }
            printf("\n");

            // Verify they both aren't divisible by ten.
            if (((i % 10) == 0) && ((j % 10) == 0)) { 
                free(check_digits);
                continue;   
            }


            // Calculate potential vampire
            dracula = i * j;
            printf("Here, I is %d and J is %d.\n", i, j);
            printf("The potential vampire is %d\n", dracula);

            // Verify potential vampire has enough digits
            sprintf(dracula_word, "%d", dracula);
            sprintf(fang2_word, "%d", j);

            printf("Lenth of dracula word is %ld\n", strlen(dracula_word));
            if ((int) strlen(dracula_word) != N) {
                printf("Wasn't long enough.\n");
                free(check_digits);
                continue;
            }


            // Count up all the vampire's digits into check_digits
            for (int k = 0; k < N; k++) {
                char digit_char;
                int digit;

                digit_char = dracula_word[k];
                digit = (int) strtol( (const char *) &digit_char, (char**) NULL, 10);
                printf("digit is %d\n", digit);
                check_digits[digit]++;
            }

            // Print out check digits
            printf("\nPrinting out check digits.\n");
            for (int k = 0; k < 10; k++) {
                printf("The digit %d occurs %d times.\n", k, check_digits[k]);
            }

            // See if they all match. No need to make sure any value of
            // check_digits is above zero because digits must already add
            // up.
            int failed = 0;
            for (int k = 0; k < N/2; k++) {
                char digit_char;
                int digit;

                digit_char = fang1_word[k];
                digit = (int) strtol( (const char *) &digit_char, (char**) NULL, 10);

                check_digits[digit]--;
                if (check_digits[digit] < 0) {
                    failed = 1;
                    break;
                }

                digit_char = fang2_word[k];
                digit = (int) strtol( (const char *) &digit_char, (char**) NULL, 10);

                check_digits[digit]--;
                if (check_digits[digit] < 0) {
                    failed = 1;
                    break;
                }
            }

            // Failed at some point during digit check phase
            if (failed) { 
                free(check_digits);
                continue;   
            }

            // They all seem to match. Print vampire number
            else {
                printf("Found vampire number: %d * %d = %d\n", i, j, dracula);
            }
        }

When I run the code and grep for a known false positive, I get the following lines:

240211-HELLO
240217-0
240219-0
240221-0
240223-0
240225-3
240227-5
240229-1
240231-3
240233-0
240235-2
240237-
240238-Here, I is 21 and J is 58.
240265:The potential vampire is 1218
240295-Lenth of dracula word is 4
240322-digit is 1
240333-digit is 2
240344-digit is 1
240355-digit is 8
240366-
240367-Printing out check digits.
240394-The digit 0 occurs 0 times.
240422-The digit 1 occurs 2 times.
240450-The digit 2 occurs 1 times.
240478-The digit 3 occurs 0 times.
240506-The digit 4 occurs 3 times.
240534-The digit 5 occurs 5 times.
240562-The digit 6 occurs 1 times.
240590-The digit 7 occurs 3 times.
240618-The digit 8 occurs 1 times.
240646-The digit 9 occurs 2 times.
240674:Found vampire number: 21 * 58 = 1218

Essentially, right after calloc returns a memory buffer, I print it out, and see that's it not clear, resulting in problems later. Any help would be appreciated.

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1  
What is N = ??? –  Jeyaram Jul 23 '13 at 4:30
    
Probably stupid question: is N == 4? –  Casey Jul 23 '13 at 4:31
3  
Why are you surprised that there are only 4 zeroed ints in check_digits when you told calloc you want 4 ints? –  Casey Jul 23 '13 at 4:35
2  
You don't have to cast the return value of malloc or calloc in a C program. –  Carl Norum Jul 23 '13 at 4:36
2  
casting the result of sizeof() to size_t is unnecessary as well. –  Casey Jul 23 '13 at 4:37

1 Answer 1

I think the error is here :

check_digits = (int *) calloc((size_t) N, (size_t) sizeof(int));
printf("HELLO\n");
for (int arg = 0; arg < 10; arg++) {
    printf("%d\n", check_digits[arg]);
}

You allocate an array of N elements (probably 4), but then you access 10 elements in the cycle for. If fact, the first 4 elements are set correctly to zero, so the calloc is correctly working. The other values (from 4 to 9) are random values because they are out of the memory allocated with calloc and therefore they are not set to zero.

To solve the problem you should use N in each cycle where you access the check_ degitis elements.

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