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Is printf's conversion specifier equivalent to function declaration as far as compiler type checking and automatic conversions go?

I'm trying to understand C basic data types automatic type conversions, promotions etc and wonder if I can use printf instead of dummy function to check what happens.

To make my question clearer with an example,

void f1 (int a){}

int main() { f1('c'); return 0; }

helps me understand what will happen if I declare a function with an int argument but pass char type in the call.

I want to know if I can just call

printf("%i", 'c');

for the above purpose.

Also if someone can point to some definitive resources (on web or books) on type representation/conversions/promotion in C, I'll be grateful.

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2  
your example doesn't help much, because in C so called "integer character constants" such as 'c' are already of type int. So wenn passing such a constant to a function that expects an int you'll never see a warning, because everything is fine. –  Jens Gustedt Jul 23 '13 at 6:28
    
@JensGustedt That is the purpose of my experiments in the first place - to understand points such as the one mentioned by you. How it works when one type is expected and other is passed- char, int, long. float, string, pointers etc etc. E.g. given here was the most basic of those. –  Lavya Jul 23 '13 at 6:44
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

No.

Many compilers don't do any type checking on format strings. gcc does, when -Wformat is used, but these checks are separate from those done on assignment.

Parameters to printf are passed as they are. The only conversion may be increasing it to a processor word size (this is how char becomes int) and it doesn't depend on the format string in any way. See Jonathan Leflfer's comment, which explains this more accurately.

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Actually, types char, unsigned char, signed char, short and unsigned short are all promoted to int (or unsigned int occasionally — very seldom these days, though), and float is promoted to double. This happens with all functions with a variable argument list once you reach the variable part of the argument list (the ... ellipsis); it also happens when you call a function with no prototype in scope (which you shouldn't do, but which does happen). –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 23 '13 at 7:07
    
This answer is pretty spot on, except that I see no char in the question... –  undefined behaviour Jul 23 '13 at 7:11
    
@undefinedbehaviour, I referred to c as char, but actually I think it's int. –  ugoren Jul 23 '13 at 7:17
    
Yes. Character literals like 'c' are in fact int values, in C. –  undefined behaviour Jul 23 '13 at 7:26
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printf("%i", 'c'); you will get ASCII value of character 'c' which is 99.There are two methods for char to int.

If you just want ASCII value of char simply print char using integer specifier.

If you want to convert a char to integer(Like '0' to 0 or '1' to 1) then you need to do as follows

char a = '4';
int ia = a - '0';  //subtraction of '0'

Just an addition for more clarity, specifier in printf says how much to pop from stack. If it is %d then pop 4 bytes(assuming int of 4 byte) if it is %c, then pop 1 byte etc.

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Thanks - your last line gives me something to think about. –  Lavya Jul 23 '13 at 6:55
    
ASCII? Why does 'c' have to correspond to 99? What if EBCDIC is used, instead? Are you aware that a %c directive corresponds to an int argument? –  undefined behaviour Jul 23 '13 at 7:09
    
@undefinedbehaviour yes i am aware that C always promote types to at least int. Here i was talking about printf output which will be 99 which is ASCII value of char 'c' –  Dayal rai Jul 23 '13 at 7:33
    
Then I suggest changing the last sentence to state that %d corresponds to the same type as %c. It's probably a good idea to phrase your first sentence without the word "ASCII", for accuracy: printf("%d", 'c'); will print the integer value corresponding to the character literal 'c'. –  undefined behaviour Jul 24 '13 at 7:59
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Is printf's conversion specifier equivalent to function declaration as far as compiler type checking and automatic conversions go?

No. When you pass a char to a variadic function, the value you pass will be promoted to an int. This is regardless of the conversion specifier you use. The C11 standard describes this at §6.5.2.2p7:

The ellipsis notation in a function prototype declarator causes argument type conversion to stop after the last declared parameter. The default argument promotions are performed on trailing arguments.

Default argument promotions are defined in §6.5.2.2p6 as a superset of integer promotions:

... the integer promotions are performed on each argument, and arguments that have type float are promoted to double. These are called the default argument promotions.

... and integer promotions are defined in §6.3.1.1p2:

If an int can represent all values of the original type (as restricted by the width, for a bit-field), the value is converted to an int; otherwise, it is converted to an unsigned int. These are called the integer promotions.


To make my question clearer with an example,

void f1 (int a){}

int main() { f1('c'); return 0; }

helps me understand what will happen if I declare a function with an int argument but pass char type in the call.

No, it doesn't. 'c' is actually an int. If you don't believe me, see for yourself:

#include <stdio.h>

#ifdef __cplusplus
#error "Don't compile C code with a C++ compiler."
#endif

int main(void) {
    printf("sizeof 'c': %zu\n", sizeof 'c');
}
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Thanks for your detailed answer and the point about 'c'. I'll remember to upvote when I have enough points. Thanks for linking the standard as well - going through that is probably what I need right now. –  Lavya Jul 23 '13 at 7:45
    
@Lavya If you haven't already, I suggest reading and doing the exercises within K&R (Kernighan and Ritchie). Once you've done that, H&S (Harbison & Steele) have a reference-style book that might be interesting. –  undefined behaviour Jul 23 '13 at 8:07
    
Yes, going through Ritchie right now. Will try to get my hands on H&S as well. Thanks! –  Lavya Jul 23 '13 at 9:18
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When you pass 'c' as an argument to the function f1 the ASCII value of alphabet c (99) will be stored into a .So if you modify the f1 function below

void f1 (int a){
 printf("\n %d",a); // prints the ascii value of charecter c
 printf("\n %c",a); //prints the o/p as c
 printf("\n %i",a); //prints the ascii value of charecter c again 
}

O/p for the program

99
c
99

You asked

I want to know if I can just call printf("%i", 'c');

Yes you can then there's no need of the implementation of the function f1.

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ASCII? Why does 'c' have to correspond to 99? What if EBCDIC is used, instead? –  undefined behaviour Jul 23 '13 at 7:06
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